11 October 2007

Thu, 11 Oct 2007 00:09:43 +0000

Our mission is to serve as a reference point for Apple II software, hardware and the like. It is not intended to be another Apple II history site, but more targeted toward reference materials such as hardware configuration, compatibility guides, repair tips, hardware hacks and mods, and related sub-topics. MediaWiki has been chosen as the presentation platform for it’s strong support base and expansive options. Some parts of the Apple2.info online reference are open to community participation, with the first being the csa2 usenet FAQ. Interested in helping out or supporting the site with donations or time editing? Find out more here -> [[A2wiki:Site_support]]

10 September 2018

Mon, 10 Sep 2018 06:56:11 +0000

Sweet Microsystems Mockingboard

1991 was proclaimed the “Year of the PC soundcard” by Sierra On-Line (Sierra), Ad-Lib and Creative duke it out to get the first one out the door, Creative ‘wins’ with the Sound Blaster Pro.
Well, as if this were the biggest thing to ever happen to a personal computer.
1981 was the year of the sound card for the Apple II. Sweet Micro Systems releases a sound card for the Apple II. It was available in two major revisions, the first, the “Sound” series, having sound and or speech options, or both, the later revision, officially named Mockingboard, offered as A, B, C, and D.

Sound I

This model consisted of one General Instrument AY-3-8910 PSG (Programmable Sound Generator) which could generate up to three audio channels.

Speech I

This model consisted of one Votrax SC-01 Speech Synthesis IC. Your computer can now speak. {s I want to plhay glowbalthermownewkleer wahr.}

Sound II

This model consisted of two General Instrument AY-3-8910 PSG (Programmable Sound Generator) IC’s which could generate up to three audio channels each, for 6 total.

Sound/Speech I

…and this one was the combination of the first two, sound and speech in a single card. 3 Channels plus one voice.

Mockingboard A

The next revision was now called the Mockingboard, make your Apple sing, install a Mockingboard. The ‘A’ utilized two General Instruments AY-3-8913 chips for six audio channels, three left, three right so stereo effects could be created. There were also two open sockets for SSI-263 speech chips. The AY-3-8913 is a smaller package version of the AY-3-8910. This was accomplished by elimination of the two onboard parallel ports that the ‘8910 incorporated. They are still included on the internal stamping but simply not attached to external leads on the DIP. This resulted in a smaller sized IC. The SSI-263 is a variation of the SC-02 which was itself, the result of minor improvements to the original SC-01/Votrax design. The SSI-263 was manufactured by Silicon Systems, Inc., which became part of Texas Instruments in the mid 1990’s. More information about the SC-01/A and derivatives can be found here; http://www.redcedar.com/sc01.htm, two SSI-263’s could be installed on the A model as an upgrade path.

Mockingboard B

This offering was simply a nicely boxed SSI-263 speech chip for Mockingboard A upgrades. You could install one or two of these on an A model. With two of them, your computer could argue with itself, male and female, you could have two voices at once.

Mockingboard C

The C model is the same as the A model but comes with one SSI-263 insatlled essentially a Mockingboard A with the upgrade pre-installed, however only one speech chip allowed allowed on the C model. If you wanted two, you had to take the ‘A’ route and install two ‘B’s.

Mockingboard D

The ‘D’ model was a long time coming, and several years later. It was made for the Apple IIc only as external box containing two speakers and an amplifier. It was equal to the Mockingboard C, having two AY-3-8913’s and one SSI-263 chip. It was sometimes referred by myself as the ‘Mockingbox’ because of it’s external configuration. The Mockingboard D was not a great seller, sadly, after all the effort put into it, and was an early example of too much, too fast, oh my, what now. Support from developers meant additional code and detection, and in even different data sent to the hardware itself, in some cases. An example was during the development of Willy Byte in the Digital Dimension, one of the few, if not only commercial releases to support the D model, when the character ‘dies’ in the game, the Mockingboard D sounded like it was saying “Oh hell” instead of “Oh well” as intended.

Mockingboard M

A later revision, sold as a bundle with Mindscape’s Bank Street Music Writer, the Mockingboard M consisted of two AY-3-8913 chips and an open socket for one SSI-263 speech chip. Making it equal to a Mockingboard A with only one empty socket. By the time this was shipped it was pretty hard to find the SSI-263 through all the normal channels, it’s almost easier today, to find one. New to this model, however, was an integrated headphone jack and a jumper to permit sound to be played through the Apple’s built-in speaker.

Audio Maximizer

The Audio Maximizer was basically the same chassis and PCB that made up the Mockingboard D except that only the speakers and amplifier were completed and installed, making this an external speaker box instead of a complete sound generating product. This was probably done as a way to reduce inventory and recoup some investment on the parts created for the Mockingboard D.

Clones and derivatives

Phasor

The Applied Engineering Phasor card was a combination Mockingboard A and AE Super Music Synthesizer which also had Echo+ support integrated. Essentially the Phasor was the all in one sound card for the Apple II. The AE Super Music Synthesizer, itself, was a clone of, but improved upon, ALF Music Synthesizer. The Phasor included four AY-8913 chips and one SSI-263, with an empty socket for a second one. With the addition of the second SSI-263, the Phasor had 12 channels of sound, four white noise generators and two speech voices. ..and still was available before the x86 platform had sound cards.

Pro MockingBoard

Peninsula Computer Company, Hong Kong, manufactured a typical far eastern clone sometimes referred to as a ‘Pro Mocker Board’, it had an extra drum channel and non-standard MIDI-out interface as well as an inbuilt 1 Watt stereo amplifier. The design was the combination of two products, the PCL Mocker Board and the Mocker Extension.

Mockingboard v1

The V1 is clone of the Mockingboard A from Reactive Computers, http://www.reactivemicro.com/

Mockingboard enhanced titles

Adventure Construction Set
Berzap! – A clone of the classic, (current at the time) arcade game, Berzerk!
Broadsides (SSI)
Crimewave – Speech supported
Crypt of Medea – Speech supported
Cybernoid Music Disk
Guitar Master – Guitar tutoring.
Lady Tut, specific Mockingboard version
Lancaster
Mockingboard software (Sweet Micro Systems)
Mockingboard Developers Kit
Mockingboard Speech Developers Kit
Music Construction Set, different revisions do more as released.
Music Star – The OEM version did not support the Mockingboard, it was later patched by the underground to use the Mockingboard instead of the proprietary hardware that shipped with it.
Night Flight
One on One – Opening sequence music only.
Phasor software (Applied Engineering)
Popeye
Rescue Raiders v1.3 – (SSI263 speech only)
Silent Service (Microprose)
Skyfox
Spy Strikes Back
Thunder Bombs
Ultima III, original release did not support the Mockingboard
Ultima IV
Ultima V – Supported two Mockingboards
Under Fire
Willy Byte
Zaxxon, specific Mockingboard version.

Other resources

http://8bitsoundandfury.no-ip.info/ – Apple II Sound & Music Software

Mon, 10 Sep 2018 06:56:10 +0000

From: tdiaz-a(in_a_circle)-apple2-dotsero-org (Tony Diaz)
Newsgroups: comp.sys.apple2,comp.answers,news.answers
Approved: news-answers-request@MIT.EDU
Followup-To: comp.sys.apple2
Subject: comp.sys.apple2 Apple II System Monitor CMD Reference
Archive-name: apple2/faq/sysmon
Posting-Frequency: monthly
Last-modified: October 11 2007
Version: 0.54
URL: http://apple2.info/wiki/index.php?title=System_Monitor
The next section is the Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) posting of the comp.sys.apple2 newsgroup. Copyright (c) 2007 by Tony Diaz (email: tdiaz-a(in_a_circle)-apple2-dotsero-org), all rights reserved. This document can be freely copied so long as 1) it is not sold, 2) any sections reposted elsewhere from it are credited back to this FAQ with the FAQ’s copyright info and official WWW location ( http://apple2.info/wiki/index.php?title=System_Monitor) left in place.
This may not be the latest version of this FAQ– this is an archived copy. For that, drop by http://apple2.info/wiki/index.php?title=System_Monitor
This FAQ may not be sold, bundled on disks or CD-ROMs, reprinted in magazines, books, periodicals, or the like without prior consent from the maintainer, Tony Diaz. Exceptions are explicitly granted for Juiced.GS and _The_Lamp. Email me for permission otherwise.
Big thanks to Nathan Mates, the previous maintainer of this comp.sys.apple2 FAQ, for allowing it to live on after his departure and anyone who took up that mantle before him.
Begin part 1 of 1
Apple II System Monitor command reference
NOTE: this reference is in beta form, and is still being written. Expect a few minor continuing changes in its layout, content, and correctness. Most info should be correct– I’d like to be notified of any problems noted in here.
Table of Contents
Section 1: General Intro to this FAQ and its conventions
Section 2: System monitor commands listed by system:
2.1 How to enter the System Monitor
2.2 Commands in all System Monitor ROMs
2.3 GS Extensions to the System Monitor
Section 3: The Miniassembler

General Intro to this reference and System Monitor

This FAQ attempts to be a reference for the commands supported by the
inbuilt System Monitor contained in the ROM of all Apple II models. As there were a number of versions of the System Monitor, I’ve attempted to delineate which features are available depending on which model of the Apple II is present.
Warning: the System Monitor allows you to change blocks or bytes of
RAM at will. You are advised that any manipulations of your Apple II’s memory may cause your Apple II to crash or worse. You have been warned of the possibility of causing any damage to your system integrity, and by following any commands listed below, you accept responsibility for what you do.
This reference is one of a series of references that have been written detailing the Apple II. You may also want to read the
Applesoft Basic FAQ, the DOS & Commands FAQ, or the comp.sys.apple2
FAQ.
Conventions used by this FAQ: Commands are given in double quotes, but those are not to be typed. is the return key on the keyboard, and should be the last thing typed on a line to be parsed. “^C” (or any other letter) is shorthand for Control-C, i.e. hold down the control key and press C. ‘Address’, ‘Address1’, ‘Address2’ are valid addresses for your system– either 16 bits or 24 for regular Apple II or GS. ‘Val’, ‘Val2’ … are valid bytes to store in memory or registers. All addresses, values, etc are hex unless explicitly stated otherwise. In addition, leading 0s from addresses and values can be omitted.

System monitor commands listed by system

How to enter the System Monitor

The system monitor is identified with an asterisk (‘*’) for a prompt.
If you have one of the earliest versions of the Apple II ROM, you will be placed in the monitor immediately on powerup. However, later
(‘Autostart’) versions look for disks to boot first. From all Apple
IIs at the Basic (either Applesoft or Integer) prompt, “CALL -151”
will enter the monitor. ProDOS’s BASIC.SYSTEM version 1.4 and up added the “MTR” command to do the same thing.
GSs with a ROM 01 or 3 have a “Visit Monitor” CDA (Classic Desk
Accessory– accessible from most programs by pressing
Control-OpenApple-Escape at once) that is builtin, but not always
enabled. To enable this CDA, the easiest way is to go to the
“SetStart” Graphical Control Panel, and make sure “Enable Programmer
CDAs” is selected, than reboot.

Commands in all System Monitor ROMs

Exiting the monitor:

From within the monitor, the easiest ways to get out are either “^B”
or “^C” (don’t forget to hit at the end of your line), which
return you to either Applesoft or Integer Basic. ^B zaps any program
and variables in memory, while ^C preserves them. If you entered the
GS’s monitor through the “Visit Monitor” CDA, DO NOT use this method
to exit to Basic; instead use ^Y as is printed when you enter the
monitor– your system will tend to crash as you attempt to exit.

Examining Memory

“Address” will dump the byte at that address; after that, if
is pressed again on a blank line, up to 8 bytes (16 if on a GS in 80-column mode) will be printed in continuing order.
“Address1.Address2” will dump all the memory between the two at up to
8/16 bytes per line. Address2 is less than Address1, only the byte at Address1 will be printed. While doing a memory dump, ^S (no
needed) will pause, ^X will stop the dump.

Disassembling Memory

“AddressL” will disassemble 20 lines worth of “instructions” starting
at that address; “L” by itself will continue on from wherever the
previous “L” ended. Note that there is no effective difference between code and data in terms of the actual bytes in memory, so if the disassembly makes no sense, it may not be of executable code.

Setting Memory

Address: val1 val2…” sets one or more bytes of memory. There is a practical limit of the number of bytes you can set at once due to the ~255 character limit of the command line, but whatever you type will be set. “:val1 val2…” continues setting memory from where the last memory set ended, allowing you to continue without retyping the starting address. If you try to mix examining and setting memory, setting reverts to the last explicitly specified address, not whatever was last displayed. For example,
2000
:FF” will set 2000 to FF.

Moving and comparing memory

Address1” will move memory in the range from Address2 to Address3 to the destination start address of Address1.
This is more of a copy than move, as the source memory is not modified if the destination range does not overlap the source. The copy is done in increasing order from Address2 to Address3.
Address1” will verify memory in the same type of block range as for moving, and print all differences, one difference per line. The address printed is the address in the source block, along with the value in the source block followed by the value (but not address) in the destination block in parens.

Simple math

Val1+Val2” and “Val1-Val2” print the result of adding or subtracting the values, truncated to 8 bits.
Examining/Setting registers, running programs “^E” will dump the current values of the registers. On pre-GS machines, this is only the A,X,Y,P and S registers.
To set the registers, immediately after a ^E, type
:NewA NewX NewY NewP NewS“. Registers may be omitted from the right sides if you don’t want to change them, but the first value always goes into the accumulator, etc.
AddressG” provides a machine language JSR to the specified address with the current registeres set as above. Assuming your code returns with a RTS, you will normally return to the monitor cleanly; if you try to execute data instead of code, the results are usually a crash.

Cassette I/O

If your Apple II supports this (Apple , + and //e only), you can read and write programs to a cassette interface attached to your computer’s ports. To write a block of memory out, type
Address1.Address2W“; reading is accomplished with
Address1.Address2R“.

DOS I/O

Assuming that you have booted and entered the Monitor from DOS 3.x or ProDOS’s BASIC.SYSTEM, you can execute all normal legal DOS commands just by typing them. This is because the OS intercepts the I/O vectors, and gets commands first before passing them on to whatever else is running. For a full list of commands, see the DOS & Commands FAQ at :DOS

Misc I/O command

N” sets the text display to “Normal” mode (white text on black background on normal Apple IIs; foreground text color on background text color for the GS); “I” sets it to “Inverse” (i.e. reverse) mode.
n^P” (n=0..7) sends output to that slot; “n^K” gets input from that slot. However, if DOS or ProDOS is active, it is highly recommended that you use the “PR#n” and “IN#n” commands to redirect I/O.

GS Extensions to the System Monitor

Note that the following are in addition to the normal features of the Apple II System Monitor as detailed above, except for the obvious lack of cassette tape support.
If you’re doing extensive GS programming work, you may find the combination of the GSBug init and the Nifty List CDA to be invaluable and far more useful and powerful than the builtin monitor. GSBug is available from Apple’s FTP site; Niftylist is on the usual legitimate Apple II ftp sites, such as:
ftp://apple2.caltech.edu/pub/apple2/addons/cda/niftylist34.shk

Extended syntax

As the 65816 in the GS can address memory 24 bits wide, addresses can now have a third byte in them. They must be specified with a ‘/’ after the bank byte, i.e. “AB/CDEF”. Banks specified simply by themself (such as “AB/”) are sticky; i.e. if the bank is omitted after that, the last set bank is used.

Searching Memory

/Pattern/” searches at most one bank for the
specified pattern. The pattern can be a set of bytes, or a string enclosed in “s.
Extended register examining and setting “^E” still works, but prints much more information on the GS’s extended registers. In addition, it is possible to set any register directly with “val=RegisterName” using the reister names as printed by ^E. The m and x registers are used by the builtin disassembler (“L”) to decide whether to print one or two bytes after immediate mode instructions. The ROM 00/01 does not track REP/SEP instructions, so if they chnage in the middle of code, the disassembly will look wrong.
The ROM 3 does it right, but may still need to be told what mode to start disassembling in. “^R” resets registers to a “default” state of mostly all 0.

Extended running programs

AddressG” still uses a JSR, so your code should be in bank 0. beep will tend to occur if you are not in bank 0. “AddressX” does a JSL to the address, and “AddressR” does a JML to that code.

Extended math and conversions

Math operations can now take up to 32-bit operands as input. Multiplication is implemented as ‘*’, and integer division is implemented as ‘_’. The result of addition/subtraction is reported as a 32-bit number; multiplication has a 64-bit result. Division has a 32-bit remainder and quotient reported. Conversions between hexadecimal and decimal is now possible; use “hexval=” to convert to decimal and “=decval” to convert to hex.

Random other GS stuff

=T” shows the current system date and time.
\{Bytes to put on stack} {Bytes to pull off stack} {Parameter bytes} {Function %23} {Tool %23}\U” will attempt to do a GS toolset call. All of the parameters are bytes, with the possible exception of the parameter list. Any execution error is reported.

The Miniassembler

The miniassembler is aptly named– it supports going from assembly mnemonic to the hex form one instruction at a time, no support for labels, inserting code, or anything else. It is mostly useful for quick tests of code.
The miniassembler is accessible from most but not all Apple IIs. From and +s with Integer Basic in ROM, type ‘F666G‘ to enter it from the monitor prompt; //c, enhanced //e, IIc+ and GS, type “!” from the monitor prompt to enter the miniassembler. This miniassembler is identified with a “!” prompt, and is separate from the normal monitor– monitor commands won’t work in it.
In the miniassembler, the first instruction is entered as follows: “Address: opcode data”. If there are any errors in a line, the speaker beeps, and a ^ is placed under the first location where it thinks there is an error. Continuing lines can be entered as follows: ” opcode data” (note leading space on line).
To exit the miniassembler, simply hit return on a blank line. In the GS, the miniassembler does not keep track of register sizes; if you want to use a 16-bit value, you must provide 3 or 4 digits, padding it with leading 0s on the left to make that many digits.

Mon, 10 Sep 2018 06:56:10 +0000

Interwiki: :P8_Tech_Ref_Chapter_1++
Interwiki: :P8_Tech_Ref_Chapter_2++
Interwiki: :P8_Tech_Ref_Chapter_3++
Interwiki: :P8_Tech_Ref_Chapter_4++
Interwiki: :P8_Tech_Ref_Chapter_5++
Interwiki: :P8_Tech_Ref_Chapter_6++
Interwiki: :P8_Tech_Ref_Appendix_A++
Interwiki: :P8_Tech_Ref_Appendix_B++
Interwiki: :P8_Tech_Ref_Appendix_C++
Interwiki: :P8_Tech_Ref_Appendix_D++
Interwiki: :P8_Tech_Ref_Index++

Mon, 10 Sep 2018 06:56:09 +0000

The Great Juiced.GS Debate

Learn New Words today!
Subscribe to Juiced.GS – http://www.juiced.gs

Mon, 10 Sep 2018 06:56:08 +0000

Page 182

Index

Index
A
A register ... 96
access ... 150, 153, 157
byte ... 13
accumulator ... 29, 77, 85
Active Entries ... 158
ALLOC_INTERRUPT call ... 35, 170, 111, 178
alternate 64K RAM bank ... 89
APPEND command ... 131
Apple II ... xvi, 98
Apple II Plus ... 98
Apple II SOS ... 176
Apple IIc ... 98, 143
Apple IIe ... 98, 143
-- with extended 80-column text card ... 89
Apple III ... 98
file types ... 176
Applesoft ... 121, 134, 142
assembly language ... 131
aux_type ... 39, 46, 50, 100, 157
auxiliary bank hi-res graphics pages ... 89
B
backup bit ... 63, 64, 172
BADCALL ... 128
bank-switching routines ... 97
BASIC.SYSTEM ... xv, 82, 121, 124, 176
BEEP example ... 136
BEEPSLOT example ... 138
binary files ... 176
bit map ... 84, 150
BLOAD command ... 132
Block Entries ... 158
Block File Manager (BFM) ... 7, 28, 31
block number ... 115, 146
blocks ... 18
blocks_used ... 50, 156
boot code ... 176
boot ROM ... 22
-- disk drives ... 112
booting ... 22
BRUN command ... 132
BSAVE command ... 132
buffer ... 15
-- allocation ... 25
-- pointer ... 115
byte, locating a specific ... 166
C
C-flag 29, 77
calender card ... See clock/calender card
calls
-- filing ... 33, 56
-- housekeeping ... 32
-- system ... 35
carry flag ... 122
CAT command ... 132
CATALOG command ... 132
catalog format ... 101
CHAIN command ... 131
clock/calender card ... 2,6,71,99
CLOSE call ... 13, 16, 17, 26, 34, 99, 104, 132
CMDADR address ... 108
Command Dispatcher ... 7,28
command list ... 134
commands, adding ... 134
CONVERT.program ... 3, 176
CREATE call ... 13, 32, 99, 104, 132
create_date ... 39, 51
create_time ... 39, 51
creation ... 150, 153, 156
-- date ... 171
-- time ... 171
creation_date ... 13
creation_time ... 13
D
dash (-) command ... 131
data blocks ... 19
data_buffer ... 15, 52, 55
data files ... 18
date and time, system ... 71
DEALLOC INTERRUPT call ... 35, 107, 112
defaults (system program) ... 100
DELETE call ... 132
DESTROY call ... 13, 32, 99, 104
device drivers ... 142
directory files ... 3,17,18,176
-- reading ... 157
-- structure ... 18
disconnecting /RAM ... 90
disk
-- access ... 16
-- controller card ... 113
-- device driver vectors ... 94
-- devices ... 95
-- driver routines ... 28
-- operating system ... xv, 2
-- RAM ... 91
-- volume ... 143
Disk II driver ... 113
disk-drive controller card ... 22
dispatcher code ... 87
DOS 3.3 ... 174
-- disks ... 73
DOS ProDOS Conversion program ... xv, 3
DOSCMD vector ... 131, 134
Page 183
E
80-column text card ... 99
emulation mode ... 98
enable_mask ... 58
endtry_length ... 154
entries (directory file) ... 17
Entries Per Block ... 150, 153, 154, 158
entry field ... 43, 47
Entry Length variable ... 158
Entry Pointer variable ... 158
entry_length ... 150, 153
entry points ... 94
EOF ... 15, 20, 67, 156, 164, 171
-- See also individual calls
error codes (ProDOS) ... 77
EXEC file ... 17, 131
EXERCISER program ... 31, 180
EXTRNCMD location ... 134
F
FBITS ... 126, 141
fields, pointer ... 148
file(s)
-- binary ... 176
-- buffer ... 26
-- closing ... 14, 16
-- control block ... 14, 56
-- creating ... 13
-- data ... 19
-- directory ... 18, 176
-- flushing ... 16
-- logical size ... 67
-- naming ... 10
-- opening ... 13
file_count ... 150, 153, 154 158
file_name ... 150, 150, 153, 156
file_type ... 13
filename ... 10
Filer, ProDOS ... 176
Filer Program ... xv
filing calls ... 3, 5
-- ProDOS vs. SOS ... 177
FLUSH ... 16, 17, 34, 99, 104, 132
FORMAT call ... 113
FRE call ... 132
G
GET_BUF call ... 26, 34
GET_EOF call ... 15, 34, 177
GET_FILE_INFO call ... 32, 43, 99, 100, 177
GET_MARK call ... 15, 34
GET_PREFIX call ... 11,33
GET_TIME call ... 35, 99, 104
GETLN input buffer ... 105, 135
global page ... 84, 104, 141
global variables ... 25
GOSYSTEM ... 127, 129
H
header entry ... 147
header_pointer ... 157
headers (subdirectory) ... 151
HELP command ... 141
hi-res graphics ... 89
HIMEM command ... 141
housekeeping calls ... 3, 32, 36-54
I
I/O buffer ... 14, 69
I/O vectors ... 123
IN# command ... 22, 132
index blocks ... 19, 160, 162, 163
input/output
-- buffer ... 14, 69
-- vectors ... 123
-- ProDOS vs. SOS ... 177
int_num ... 72, 73
interrupt(s) ... 2, 72
-- routines ... 97
exit routines ... 97
handler ... 28
handling calls ... 3
Receiver/Dispatcher ... 7
vector(s) ... 96
-- table ... 72
interrupt-driven devices ... 121
io_buffer ... 16, 33
-- See also individual calls
IVERSION ... 97
J
jump to subroutine (JSR) ... 29
K
key block ... 146, 147, 151, 159, 162, 164
key_pointer ... 156
key_pointer field ... 36
KVERSION ... 97
Page 184
L
language card area ... 106
last_mod ... 157
level ... 56
linked list ... 36
LOAD command ... 131
loader program ... 22, 146
LOCK command ... 132
logical block ... 146
LOMEM command ... 122
M
MACHID byte ... 96, 98
machine configuration ... 98
Machine Language Interface (MLI) ... 3
machine language routines ... xv, 121
MARK ... 14, 15, 20, 65, 66, 164, 166
master index block ... 19, 160, 163
memory ... 98
-- calls ... 3
-- handling (ProDOS vs. SOS) ... 178
-- management ... 2
-- map ... 24, 95
-- page ... 181
min_version ... 150, 153, 157
MLI (Machine Language Interface) ... 3, 5, 15, 22, 23, 25, 108, 180
-- entry point ... 94
-- issuing calls to ... 29
MLIATV flag ... 108
mod_date ... 46
mod_time ... 46, 50
Modify Buffer command ... 181
monitor ... 142
N
name_length ... 150, 153, 154, 156, 158
new_pathname ... 42
NEWLINE call ... 15, 33
newline_char ... 58
NOHELP command ... 141
null prefix ... 11
null_field ... 46
O
ON_LINE command ... 33, 178
OPEN call ... 26, 31, 33, 132, 177
P
pages ... 5
param_count ... See individual calls
parameter count ... 31
parent_entry_length ... 154
parent_entry_number ... 154
parent_pointer ... 153
parsing command ... 140
partial pathnames ... 10, 11
Pascal area ... 156
pathname ... 10, 11, 13
PBITS ... 126, 135, 141
peripheral cards ... xvii
pointer ... 18, 31
POSITION command ... 132
PR# command ... 22, 132
prefix ... 11, 132
ProDOS BASIC Programming Examples disk ... 3
ProDOS ... xv
-- Editor/Assembler ... 176
-- error codes ... 77
-- Filer ... 3, 20
-- Machine Language Interface ... 5, 142, 180
PRODOS program ... 22
ProDOS User's Disk ... 3
ProFile ... 4
program selectors ... 86
Q
QUIT call ... 87
R
/RAM ... 23, 89, 143
-- alternate 64K RAM bank ... 89
-- disconnecting ... 90
-- reinstalling ... 92
RAM disks ... 91
READ call ... 15, 33, 113, 131
READ_BLOCK call ... 35, 73, 174
ref_num ... 13
reference number ... 15, 16
register, stack ... 96
RENAME call ... 13, 32, 99, 104, 132, 150, 153, 156
request_count ... 62
-- See also individual calls
RESET vector ... 101
RESTORE command ... 132
result command ... 31
RUN command ... 131
RWTS (DOS 3.3) ... 174
S
sapling file ... 19, 156, 160, 164, 171
SAVE command ... 132
search order, volume ... 23
sectors ... 146
seedling file ... 19, 156, 160, 161
SET_BUF call ... 26
SET_EOF call ... 15, 34, 178
Page 185
SET_FILE_INFO call ... 13, 32, 47, 99, 100, 104, 157, 172
SET_MARK call ... 15, 34, 66, 178
SET_PREFIX call ... 11, 33
SHOWTIME program ... 109-112
16-sector ROMs ... 113
6502 machine language ... xv, xvi
6502 registers ... 107, 108
slot(s) ... xvii
-- and drive ... 100
-- 5 ... 113
-- 6 ... 113
soft switches ... 106
SOS file ... 177
SOS KERNEL file ... 176
SOS volume command ... 178
sparse files ... 161
stack ... 25, 89, 107
register ... 96
standard files ... 17, 19, 159-166
starting up ... 22
startup disk ... 22
startup volume ... 23
STATUS call ... 113
status register ... 96
storage_type ... 13, 36, 39, 50, 150, 153, 154, 156, 158, 159, 162, 163
STORE command ... 132
strings ... 140
subdirectory ... 4
-- files ... 147
SYSCTBL ... 129
system
-- bit map ... 5
-- date and time ... 71, 99
-- failure ... 79
-- global page ... 22
-- level ... 16
-- prefix ... 55
-- programs ... 2,3,25,82

quitting ... 87
starting ... 86 T 13-sector ROMs ... 113 tone, Warning ... 101 total_blocks ... 151 tracks ... 146 trans_count ... 62 -- See also individual calls tree files ... 19, 156, 159, 160, 164, 171 tree structure ... 19, 36 U unit_num ... 52 UNLOCK command ... 132 V value ... 31 variables (global) ... 25 version ... 150, 153, 156 volume(s) ... 146 -- bit map ... 146 -- directory ... 4, 147 -- directory file ... 146 -- finding ... 100 -- names ... 10, 51 -- search order ... 23 VPATH1 ... 141 VPATH2 ... 141 W WRITE command ... 15, 34, 113, 131 write buffer ... 64 WRITE_BLOCK call ... 35, 73, 174 X X register ... 96, 122 XCNUM ... 135, 141 XLEN ... 135, 141 XRETURN ... 135 XTRNADDR ... 135, 141 XXX.SYSTEM ... 22, 82 Y Y register ... 96, 122 Z zero page ... 107

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ASCII Tables
Binary
Dec     ASCII   Hex     76543210
0       NUL     00      00000000
1       SOH     01      00000001
2       STX     02      00000010
3       ETX     03      00000011
4       EOT     04      00000100
5       ENQ     05      00000101
6       ACK     06      00000110
7       BEL     07      00000111
8       BS      08      00001000
9       HT      09      00001001
10      LF      0A      00001010
11      VT      0B      00001011
12      FF      0C      00001100
13      CR      0D      00001101
14      50      0E      00001110
15      SI      0F      00001111
16      DLE     10      00010000
17      DC1     11      00010001
18      DC2     12      00010010
19      003     13      00010011
20      004     14      00010100
21      NAK     15      00010101
22      SYN     16      00010110
23      ETB     17      00010111
24      CAN     18      00011000
25      EM      19      00011001
26      SUB     1A      00011010
27      ESC     1B      00011011
28      FS      1C      00011100
29      GS      1D      00011101
30      RS      1E      00011110
31      US      1F      00011111
Binary
Dec     ASCII   Hex     76543210
32      SP      20      00100000
33      !       21      00100001
34      "       22      00100010
35      #       23      00100011
36      $       24      00100100
37      %       25      00100101
38      &       26      00100110
39      '       27      00100111
40      (       28      00101000
41      )       29      00101001
42      *       2A      00101010
43      +       2B      00101011
44      ,       2C      00101100
45      -       2D      00101101
46      .       2E      00101110
47      /       2F      00101111
48      0       30      00110000
49      1       31      00110001
50      2       32      00110010
51      3       33      00110011
52      4       34      00110100
53      5       35      00110101
54      6       36      00110110
55      7       37      00110111
56      8       38      00111000
57      9       39      00111001
58      .       3A      00111010
59      ;       3B      00111011
60      <       3C      00111100
61      =       3D      00111101
62      >       3E      00111110
63      ?       3F      00111111
Binary
Dec     ASCII   Hex     76543210
64      @       40      01000000
65      A       41      01000001
66      B       42      01000010
67      C       43      01000011
68      D       44      01000100
69      E       45      01000101
70      F       46      01000110
71      G       47      01000111
72      H       48      01001000
73      I       49      01001001
74      J       4A      01001010
75      K       4B      01001011
76      L       4C      01001100
77      M       4D      01001101
78      N       4E      01001110
79      0       4F      01001111
80      P       50      01010000
81      Q       51      01010001
82      R       52      01010010
83      S       53      01010011
84      T       54      01010100
85      U       55      01010101
86      V       56      01010110
87      W       57      01010111
88      X       58      01011000
89      Y       59      01011001
90      Z       5A      01011010
91             5B      01011011
92      /       5C      01011100
93             5D      01011101
94      ^       5E      01011110
95      _       5F      01011111
Binary
Dec     ASCII   Hex     76543210
96      `       60      01100000
97      a       61      01100001
98      b       62      01100010
99      C       63      01100011
100     d       64      01100100
101     e       65      01100101
102     f       66      01100110
103     g       67      01100111
104     h       68      01101000
105     i       69      01101001
106     j       6A      01101010
107     k       6B      01101011
108     I       6C      01101100
109     m       6D      01101101
110     n       6E      01101110
111     a       6F      01101111
112     p       70      01110000
113     q       71      01110001
114     r       72      01110010
115     s       73      01110011
116     t       74      01110100
117     u       75      01110101
118     v       76      01110110
119     w       77      01110111
120     x       78      01111000
121     y       79      01111001
122     z       7A      01111010
123     {       7B      01111011
124            7C      01111100
125     }       7D      01111101
126             7E      01111110
127     DEL     7F      01111111

File Types

file_type       Preferred Use
$00             Typeless file (SOS and ProDOS)
$01             Bad block file
$02 *           Pascal code file
$03 *           Pascal text file
$04             ASCII text file (SOS and ProDOS)
$05 *           Pascal data file
$06             General binary file (SOS and ProDOS)
$07 *           Font file
$08             Graphics screen file
$09 *           Business BASIC program file
$0A *           Business BASIC data file
$0B *           Word Processor file
$0C *           SOS system file
$0D,$0E *       SOS reserved
$0F             Directory file (SOS and ProDOS)
$10 *           RPS data file
$11 *           RPS index file
$12 *           AppleFile discard file
$13 *           AppleFile model file
$14 *           AppleFile report format file
$15 *           Screen library file
$16-$18 *       SOS reserved
$19             AppleWorks Data Base file
$1A             AppleWorks Word Processor file
$1B             AppleWorks Spreadsheet file
$1C-$EE         Reserved
$EF             Pascal area
$F0             ProDOS added command file
$F1-$F8         ProDOS user defined files 1-8
$F9             ProDOS reserved
$FA             Integer BASIC program file
$FB             Integer BASIC variable file
$FC             Applesoft program file
$FD             Applesoft variables file
$FE             Relocatable code file (EDASM)
$FF             ProDOS system file
  • Apple III SOS only; not used by ProDOS.

For the file_types used by Apple III SOS only, refer to the SOS Reference Manual.

MLI Error Codes

$00:    No error
$01:    Bad system call number
$04:    Bad system call parameter count
$25:    Interrupt table full
$27:    I/O error
$28:    No device connected
$2B:    Disk write protected
$2E:    Disk switched
$40:    Invalid pathname
$42:    Maximum number of files open
$43:    Invalid reference number
$44:    Directory not found
$45:    Volume not found
$46:    File not found
$47:    Duplicate filename
$48:    Volume full
$49:    Volume directory full
$4A:    Incompatible file format, also a ProDOS directory
$4B:    Unsupported storage_type
$4C:    End of file encountered
$4D:    Position out of range
$4E:    File access error, also file locked
$50:    File is open
$51:    Directory structure damaged
$52:    Not a ProDOS volume
$53:    Invalid system call parameter
$55:    Volume Control Block table full
$56:    Bad buffer address
$57:    Duplicate volume
$5A:    File structure damaged

Refer to Section 4.8 for a more detailed description of these error codes.

ProDOS MLI Calls


4.4.1 CREATE ($C0)
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
0 param_count = 7
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
1 pathname (low)
2 (2-byte pointer) (high)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
3 access (1-byte value)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
4 file_type (1-byte value)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
5 aux_type (low)
6 (2-byte value) (high)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
7 storage_type (1-byte value)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
8 create_date (byte 0)
9 (2-byte value) (byte 1)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
A create_time (byte 0)
B (2-byte value) (byte 1)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+


4.4.2 DESTROY ($C1)
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
0 param_count = 1
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
1 pathname (low)
2 (2-byte pointer) (high)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+


4.4.3 RENAME ($C2)
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
0 param_count = 2
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
1 pathname (low)
2 (2-byte pointer) (high)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
3 new_pathname (low)
4 (2-byte pointer) (high)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+


4.4.4 SET_FILE_INFO ($C3)
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
0 param_count = 7
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
1 pathname (low)
2 (2-byte pointer) (high)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
3 access (1-byte value)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
4 file_type (1-byte value)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
5 aux_type (low)
6 (2-byte value) (high)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
7
8 null_field (3 bytes)
9
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
A mod_date (byte 0)
B (2-byte value) (byte 1)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
C mod_time (byte 0)
D (2-byte value) (byte 1)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+


4.4.5 GET_FILE_INFO ($C4)
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
0 param_count = $A
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
1 pathname (low)
2 (2-byte pointer) (high)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
3 access (1-byte result)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
4 file_type (1-byte result)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
5 aux_type (low) *
6 (2-byte result) (high)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
7 storage_type (1-byte result)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
8 blocks used (low) *
9 (2-byte result) (high)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
A mod_date (byte 0)
B (2-byte result) (byte 1)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
C mod_time (byte 0)
D (2-byte result) (byte 1)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
E create_date (byte 0)
F (2-byte result) (byte 1)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
10 create_time (byte 0)
11 (2-byte result) (byte 1)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+

  • When file information about a

volume directory is requested,
the total number of blocks on
the volume is returned in the
aux_type field and the total
blocks for all files is returned
in blocks_used.


4.4.6 ON_LINE ($C5)
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
0 param_count = 2
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
1 unit_num (1-byte value)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
2 data_buffer (low)
3 (2-byte pointer) (high)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+


4.4.7 SET_PREFIX ($C6)
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
0 param_count = 1
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
1 pathname (low)
2 (2-byte pointer) (high)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+


4.4.8 GET_PREFIX ($C7)
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
0 param_count = 1
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
1 data_buffer (low)
2 (2-byte pointer) (high)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+


4.5.1 OPEN ($C8)
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
0 param_count = 3
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
1 pathname (low)
2 (2-byte pointer) (high)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
3 io_buffer (low)
4 (2-byte pointer) (high)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
5 ref_num (1-byte result)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+


4.5.2 NEWLINE ($C9)
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
0 param_count = 3
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
1 ref_num (1-byte value)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
2 enable_mask (1-byte value)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
3 newline_char (1-byte value)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+


4.5.3 READ ($CA)
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
0 param_count = 4
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
1 ref_num (1-byte value)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
2 data_buffer (low)
3 (2-byte pointer) (high)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
4 request_count (low)
5 (2-byte value) (high)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
6 trans_count (low)
7 (2-byte result) (high)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+


4.5.4 WRITE ($CB)
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
0 param_count = 4
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
1 ref_num (1-byte value)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
2 data_buffer (low)
3 (2-byte pointer) (high)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
4 request_count (low)
5 (2-byte value) (high)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
6 trans_count (low)
7 (2-byte result) (high)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+


4.5.5 CLOSE ($CC)
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
0 param_count = 1
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
1 ref_num (1-byte value)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+


4.5.6 FLUSH ($CD)
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
0 param_count = 1
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
1 ref_num (1-byte value)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+


4.5.7 SET_MARK ($CE)
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
0 param_count = 2
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
1 ref_num (1-byte value)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
2 (low)
3 position (3-byte value)
4 (high)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+


4.5.8 GET_MARK ($CF)
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
0 param_count = 2
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
1 ref_num (1-byte value)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
2 (low)
3 position (3-byte result)
4 (high)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+


4.5.9 SET_EOF ($D0)
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
0 param_count = 2
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
1 ref_num (1-byte value)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
2 (low)
3 EOF (3-byte value)
4 (high)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+


4.5.10 GET_EOF ($D1)
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
0 param_count = 2
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
1 ref_num (1-byte value)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
2 (low)
3 EOF (3-byte result)
4 (high)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+


4.5.11 SET_BUF ($D2)
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
0 param_count = 2
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
1 ref_num (1-byte value)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
2 io_buffer (low)
3 (2-byte pointer) (high)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+


4.5.12 GET_BUF ($D3)
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
0 param_count = 2
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
1 ref_num (1-byte value)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
2 io_buffer (low)
3 (2-byte result) (high)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+


4.6.2 ALLOC_INTERRUPT ($40)
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
0 param_count = 2
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
1 int_num (1-byte result)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
2 int_code (low)
3 (2-byte pointer) (high)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+


4.6.3 DEALLOC_INTERRUPT ($41)
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
0 param_count = 1
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
1 int_num (1-byte value)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+


4.7.1 READ_BLOCK ($80)
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
0 param_count = 3
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
1 unit_num (1-byte value)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
2 data_buffer (low)
3 (2-byte pointer) (high)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
4 block_num (low)
5 (2-byte value) (high)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+


4.7.2 WRITE_BLOCK ($81)
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
0 param_count = 3
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
1 unit_num (1-byte value)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
2 data_buffer (low)
3 (2-byte pointer) (high)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
4 block_num (low)
5 (2-byte value) (high)
+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+—+
Errors in this manual The following errors were noted in this manual and faithfully reproduced:

  • page xi: two consecutive sections labeled B.4.2.3
  • page 2: the caption for Figure 1-1 is missing
  • page 24: memory map lists $300 twice
  • page 28: “management” misspelled as “mangagement”
  • page 60: param_count is missing “(1-byte value)”
  • page 70: param_count is missing “(1-byte value)”
  • page 83: memory map lists $300 twice
  • page 95: “unprotected” misspelled as “uprotected”
  • page 99: “calendar” misspelled as “calender”
  • page 108: “the the” instead of “the”
  • page 109: “calendar” misspelled as “calender”
  • page 111: the two routines are in each other’s position
  • page 114: “interruptible” misspelled as “interruptable”
  • page 114: some text appears to be missing after 6.3.2
  • page 119: memory map lists $300 twice
  • page 125: “Temporary” misspelled as “Temporory”
  • page 131: address of RSHIMEM is BEF8 and should be BEFB
  • page 135: “inspecting” misspelled as “inpecting”
  • page 147: “directory” misspelled as “drectory”
  • page 183: “calendar” misspelled as “calender” three times
  • page 184: both “endtry_length” and “entry_length” with different page numbers
  • Quick Reference Card: tilde (~) missing from ASCII table
Mon, 10 Sep 2018 06:56:07 +0000

Appendix D – The ProDOS Machine Language Exerciser

Page 179
The ProDOS Exerciser program is a menu-driven program that allows
you to practice calls to the ProDOS Machine Language Interface
without writing a system program. It is useful for learning how the
various ProDOS MLI calls work. Using it, you can test the behavior of
a ProDOS-based program before writing any code.

How to Use It

To start up the Exerciser program from BASIC, type
-/EXERCISER/EXER.SYSTEM
and press RETURN.
This causes the Exerciser (which is a machine-language program, but
not a system program) to be loaded at $2000, and then relocated to the
highest available spot in memory. On a 64K system, it occupies
memory from $7400 on.
The Exerciser main menu displays all the MLI calls and their call
numbers, as well as a few other commands. To select an MLI call,
simply type the call number followed by RETURN. To select one of
the other commands, type the displayed letter followed by RETURN.
When you select either a call or a command, a list of parameters for
that call is displayed. The parameters for each MLI call are displayed
almost exactly as they would have to be coded in a ProDOS-based
application. The only difference is that a true parameter list would
contain a two-byte pointer to a pathname, whereas the Exerciser
displays the pathname itself. The meanings of the parameters for each
ProDOS call are described in Chapter 4 in the section describing that
call.
The default values for each of the parameters are displayed. The
cursor pauses at each of the parameters that requires a value to be
entered. You may accept the default value by pressing RETURN or
change the value by typing the new value followed by RETURN. All
values are displayed and entered in hexadecimal.
When you have entered values for all required parameters, press
RETURN. The call is executed, values returned by the call are
displayed, and an error message is displayed. If error $00 is indicated
the call was successful. If the call was unsuccessful, the Apple II
beeps as it displays the error message.
Errors are discussed at the end of Chapter 4.
Page 180

Modify Buffer

The Modify Buffer command can be used to examine or edit the
Contents of memory. It asks you for a data buffer address; this is the
address at which you wish to start editing. You can then page forward
or backward through memory using > and <, respectively. Each screen displays the values of 256 consecutive bytes, arranged in 16 rows of eight bytes each. The ASCII characters associated with these bytes are displayed at the right of the screen (as printed with the high bits set). On a standard Apple II, lowercase ASCII codes are converted to the corresponding uppercase codes. Each row is preceded by the address of the first byte in that row (just like the LIST command in the Apple II Monitor). To move the cursor to a different byte on the screen, use J,
K, and M, or the arrow keys. To change a byte of memory, simply
type the new value right over the old one. The value is updated in
memory as well as on the screen. The Modify Buffer command
remembers the original values of the last 16 bytes you changed. To
restore up to sixteen changed bytes, press U (for Undo) once for each
value to be restored.
If a memory page is marked in the system bit map as used by the
system, the editor displays the message MEMORY PAGE
PROTECTED and it does not allow you to change a value in that
page.

Screen shot from front cover

+









-+ * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * PRODOS * * MACHINE LANGUAGE INTERFACE * * SYSTEM CALL EXERCISER * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * $C0-CREATE $CB-WRITE $C1-DESTROY $CC-CLOSE $C2-RENAME $CD-FLUSH $C3-SET FILE INFO $CE-SET MARK $C4-GET FILE INFO $CF-GET MARK $C5-ON LINE $D0-SET EOF $C6-SET PREFIX $D1-GET EOF $C7-GET PREFIX $D2-SET BUF $C8-OPEN $D3-GET BUF $C9-NEWLINE $80-READ BLOCK $CA-READ $81-WRITE BLOCK _______________________________________ L - LIST DIRECTORY Q - QUIT M - MODIFY BUFFER SELECT COMMAND: $C0_ +









-+

Page 181

Mon, 10 Sep 2018 06:56:06 +0000

Appendix C – ProDOS, the Apple III, and SOS

Page 175
This appendix explains the relationships between ProDOS, the
Apple III, and SOS. It should be helpful to those already familiar with
SOS and to those thinking about developing assembly-language
programs concurrently for SOS and ProDOS.

ProDOS, the Apple III, and SOS

As explained earlier in the manual, blocks 0 and 1 of a
ProDOS-formatted disk contain the boot code — the code that reads the
operating system from the disk and runs it. Not explained was that
this boot code runs on either an Apple II or an Apple III.
When you start up either an Apple II or an Apple III system with a
ProDOS disk, the boot code is loaded at $800, and executed. The first
thing it does is look to see whether it is running on an Apple II or
Apple III. If it is running on an Apple II, it tries to load in the file
PRODOS. If it is running on an Apple III, it tries to load in the file
SOS.KERNEL. In either case, if the proper file is not found, it displays
the appropriate error message.
This means that two versions of an application could be written, one
for the Apple II, the other for the Apple III, and packaged together on
the same disk. This single disk could be sold to both Apple II and
Apple III owners.

File Compatibility

SOS and ProDOS use the same directory structure: no exceptions.
Every file on a ProDOS disk can be read by a SOS program and vice
versa.
The file types that are used by both systems are directory files, text
files, and binary files. These three types are adequate for the sharing
of data between SOS and ProDOS versions of the same program.
File types that are intended for one system, but encountered on the
other (as when you CATALOG a ProDOS disk using Business BASIC)
are not inherently different from recognized file types; they just might
cause a number to be displayed as their type instead of a name. The
ProDOS BASIC system program, Filer, Conversion program, and
Editor/Assembler all recognize and display names for all currently
defined SOS file types. The abbreviations displayed when Apple III file
types are encountered using ProDOS are shown in the quick reference
section of this manual.
Page 176

Operating System Compatibility

Because of the larger amount of memory available to SOS, it is a much
more complete operating system than is ProDOS. SOS has a complete
and well defined file manager, device manager, memory manager, and
interrupt and event handler. ProDOS has a file manager and simplified
interrupt and memory calls.

Comparison of Input/Output

SOS communicates with all devices — the console, printers, disk drives,
and so on — by making open, read, write, and close calls to the
appropriate device; writing to one device is essentially the same as
writing to another. ProDOS can perform these operations on files only.
Apple II peripherals generally have their driver code in ROM on the
peripheral card. There is no consistent method for communicating with
them. Thus the protocol for using any particular device must be known
by the system program that is currently running.

Comparison of Filing Calls

The set of calls to the ProDOS operating system is essentially a subset
of the calls to SOS. All filing calls shared by the two systems have the
same call number and nearly identical sets of parameters. Some
differences are:

  • With ProDOS you don’t specify the file size when you create a file.

Files are automatically extended when necessary.

  • With SOS the GET_FILE_INFO call returns the size of the file in
  • bytes (the EOF). In ProDOS you must OPEN the file and then use
    the GET_EOF call.
    Page 177

    • The SOS VOLUME command corresponds to the ProDOS ON_LINE

    command. When given a device name, VOLUME returns the volume
    name for that device. When given a unit number (derived from the
    slot and drive), ON_LINE returns the volume name.

    • For SOS, SET_MARK and SET_EOF can use a displacement from

    the current position. ProDOS uses only an absolute position in the
    file.

    Memory Handling Techniques

    SOS has a fairly sophisticated memory manager: a system program
    requests memory from SOS, either by location or by amount needed. If
    the request can be satisfied, SOS grants it. That portion of memory is
    then the sole responsibility of the requestor until it is released.
    A ProDOS system program is responsible for its own memory
    management. It must find free memory, and then allocate it by
    marking it off in a memory bit map. If a page of memory is marked in
    the bit map, ProDOS will not write data into that page. ProDOS can
    thus prevent users from destroying protected areas of memory
    (presumably all data is brought into memory using the ProDOS READ
    call).

    Comparison of Interrupts

    In SOS, any device capable of generating an interrupt must have a
    device driver capable of handling the interrupt; the device driver and
    the interrupt handler are inseparable. ProDOS does not have device
    drivers; thus, interrupt handling routines are installed separately using
    the ALLOC_INTERRUPT call. Also, whereas SOS has a distinct
    interrupt priority for each device in the system, ProDOS must poll the
    routines one by one until someone claims the interrupt.
    Page 178

    9 September 2018

    Sun, 09 Sep 2018 06:56:13 +0000

    Apple Internal Diagnostic Routines

    Apple IIgs

    The Apple IIgs has a fairly extensive inbuilt diagnostic program that is easily accessed at power up by holding the Open-Apple & Option keys when turning on the power, or at any time when pressing Control – Open-Apple – Option – Reset.

    #Name$Location

    1 ROM Checksum $FF/7CAE
    2 RAM 1 — Moving Inversions $FF/776C
    3 Softwitches and Status Reg. $FF/7A58
    4 RAM Addressing $FF/7F54
    5 Speed (Fast Processor Interface) $FF/7AF7
    6 Serial Test $FF/7902
    7 Clock $FF/7CFA
    8 Battery RAM (BRAM) $FF/7DD3
    9 Apple Desktop Bus $FF/7EC9
    A Shadow Register $FF/7D5F
    B Interrupts $FF/7B3C

    A failure of any of these tests is indicated by an error code on the screen and a high pitched tone. While the tests are executing, the border color changes as the test cycles both internally, and to the next test sequence.
    Some commentary about failures:
    Test 1 – A ROM checksum failure would indicate that the onboard ROM chip has failed, and while this is pretty rare, anything is a possibility. But in actuality, if the ROM were to fail in such a manner it’s more likely that it would simply not work at power up. The fix here, get another ROM perhaps, but if you have one, you probably have a motherboard – swap the the whole thing, if you know that other one is good.
    Test 5 – Speed Test, a failure here usually means the computer is unpredictable to not usable, as many peripherals depend in set speeds and other areas can run faster, part of the FPI function is to regulate processor speed, as it’s name implies, for what needs fast and what needs slow. If this is not working, .. you can see where that can lead.
    Test 6 – Serial Test, these test the internal function of the serial port and should be done without anything hooked to either serial port. A failure here usually means you’re out of luck as the components are all soldered.
    Test 7 – Clock, if the clock battery is bad this test will not fail, but rather if you have issues here it’s generally that the onboard RTC (Real Time Clock) circuit has ceased to function properly. Most of the time this results in a stuck clock. But I have seen a few where it fails yet software still works just fine.
    Test 8 – BRAM, an error with Battery RAM usually means that the RAM area used has gone bad, but could also mean the contents are scrambled up. This can usually be cleared up by holding down Control – Closed-Apple – Reset, and then picking “Set System Standards – xxHz” where the 60 or 50 Hz option that is proper for your locality/electricity network. US, Tokyo, other parts of North America would be 60 Hz, and Europe, Australasia, Asia and the southern half of Japan are usually 50 Hz. NTSC TV is 60 Hz, PAL, SECAM are 50 Hz.
    Test 9 – ADB, an Apple Desktop Bus failure could be attributed to the mouse, keyboard or other ADB peripheral plugged in as well. If you have this, try the tests with just the keyboard first, or another keyboard. If it persists you’ll probably be replacing the motherboard.
    Test B – Interrupts, an interrupt at the level this test is concerned with is a type of asynchronous (meaning, one sided, on it’s own) signal internal to the functioning of the computer. The disk drive is ready to be used, or memory can be read now, or keyboard input is acknowledged. If there is a failure here you might not notice anything and be able to use the computer, but chances are good that any intense use will probably result in unwanted behavior.

    Apple //e – Original Release (1982)

    The original Apple //e has an inbuilt diagnostic routine that really doesn’t give you much in the way of usable information, just that “everything is okay” when it passes. Generally, if the machine comes on, it’s usually going to work. Otherwise a failure might just be IMU, MMU, etc. and that usually refers to one of the custom ICs. Generally, swapping that IC fixes the problem. A motherboard that passes all it’s tests will have KERNEL OK on the screen at the end.

    Apple //e – Enhanced

    The Enhanced //e added a little more to the diagnostic routine in the way of what information it gives at any particular failure, but is similar to the original //e except it can now tell you which RAM chip is bad, by putting zeros and 1s with asterisks as an indicator, and when the test terminates it will say “System OK” in the middle of the screen.

    Apple //c – Original Release (1983)

    The original //c has some very rudimentary looping test sequence in ROM that really doesn’t tell you much. If it runs a pattern with an alternating screen cycle, and clicks, and keeps doing it, usually … that machine is working. I know, really helpful there..

    Apple //c – Enhanced (1985), and IIc Plus

    The Enhanced //c,, with UniDisk 3.5″ support and further models of the //c as well as the IIc Plus all have a test sequence that is similar to the Enhanced Apple //e, and will tell you about a custom IC failure or the RAM.

    General notes for the 8 bit Apple II’s

    The newer Apple //e and //c motherboards use 4 bit deep RAM, instead of 1 bit RAM, and that means that the newer ones will have only TWO RAM chips in the case of the //e, and four for a //c or IIc Plus. The diagnostic routine will still tell you as if it had 8 chips onboard. If the failure is any of the first four, it’s the lower RAM chip in the bank in question, and the upper, would be the higher.
    Apple //e and //c motherboards with soldered RAM can be tricky to remove them. The PCB construction is fairly fragile with respect to the through-holes and pulling out leads. A dirty trick with RAM is, if the RAM chip has failed “open”, it can be ‘repaired’ simply by piggy-backing a working chip on top of it. This is one way of quickly testing before actually replacing them. Just use a known good chip, with it’s leads squeezed together tightly, and place it on top of the suspect bad one. If the test continues to fail you either do not have the right one, or the RAM is failed in a closed/written state and will have to be removed.
    Many failures can be attributed to connection issues and are solved by re-seating the socketed chips. One way I do this is just to take the palm of your hand and ‘mash’ down on all the exposed chips. You will hear creaking, cracking, screeching, sounds. Thats okay. Do that and then try it again.
    Another failure is also the power supply connector. Simply removing and replacing the connector from the motherboard several times can be all that is needed. In the case of the IIgs, it may need to be cleaned as this type of connector is very susceptible to corrosion.

    General notes for the Apple IIgs

    In addition to as noted above with the power supply connector, another ‘popular’ IIgs problem is the metal shielding inside the lower half of the case actually starts to interfere with the operation of the computer. One of the first things I do when having issues with the IIgs may be to remove the motherboard from the case and run the whole thing on the table. Especially if I see traces of rust when opening the case. If this proves to be the issue, you can remove the metal or find a paper grocery bag and cut out a piece the size of the motherboard and place it into the case, poking through all the mount points and then return the motherboard to the case.

    Apple ///

    The Apple /// has some internal diagnostic tests that are run every time the computer is turned on, and can be somewhat cryptic, but the most popular one is that the computer will fail if the keyboard lightbulb is missing or blown. The Apple /// will also inform you about RAM and logic failures, but you will need some documentation to get to the root of the problem.
    In addition, the general notes for the 8 bit Apple II’s can also be applied here with regards to loose or corroded connections on IC’s and the connectors.

    Sun, 09 Sep 2018 06:56:12 +0000

    The IIgs has two memory clocks: the processor (65816) bus, which connects to the Fast RAM, and the Mega II (Apple II-compatible) bus, which connects to the Slow RAM and peripherals.
    The 816 bus clock is identified by the symbol ?2 and the M2 bus clock is identified by ?0. The complement of the M2 clock is denoted ?1. Both clocks are derived from a 14.31818 MHz master clock, which is known as 14M.
    In the following description, phase 1 refers to the period where a bus clock is low, and phase 2 refers to the period where the bus clock is high. A time measurement in cycles refers to the number of cycles of 14M.

    Mega II bus clock

    Frequency 1.023 MHz
    Duty cycle 50% (7:7 cycles)
    Period 978 ns (14 cycles)
    Phase 1 489 ns (7 cycles)
    Phase 2 489 ns (7 cycles)

    816 bus clock

    The 816 clock is irregular and runs different cycles depending on what memory location is accessed.
    The normal cycle is used for accesses to Fast RAM or ROM.

    Normal cycle
    Frequency 2.864 MHz
    Duty cycle 60% (2:3 cycles)
    Period 349.2 ns (5 cycles)
    Phase 1 139.7 ns (2 cycles)
    Phase 2 209.5 ns (3 cycles)

    The 1.4 MHz cycle is used for refreshing RAM? XXX Verify this, and determine where the refresh takes place.

    1.4 MHz cycle
    Frequency 1.432 MHz
    Duty cycle 80% (2:8 cycles)
    Period 698.4 ns (10 cycles)
    Phase 1 139.7 ns (2 cycles)
    Phase 2 558.7 ns (8 cycles)

    The Mega II synchronization cycle is used when a Slow RAM or shadowed write access is made in order to match the Mega II clock. This cycle consists of a variable-length ?2 extension period, where the ?2 clock signal is held high from the 816 cycle’s phase 2 until the phase 2 of the next M2 bus cycle. At that point, ?2 will follow the M2 bus clock for its phase 2.
    The IIgs does not use the RDY signal for synchronization.

    Mega II sync cycle
    Previous cycle
    Phase 2 extension
    Variable-length
    Phase 1
    M2 only; ?2 held high
    489 ns (7 cycles)
    Phase 2 489 ns (7 cycles)
    Sun, 09 Sep 2018 06:56:12 +0000
    ***************************************************************************
    *                                                                         *
    *                    Apple ][ Emulator Resources Guide                    *
    *                              version 1.3.7                              *
    *                                                                         *
    *                       (c) 1995-1998 Alex Maddison                       *
    *                            <alexm@zip.com.au>                           *
    *                                                                         *
    *               Corrections and constructive criticism welcome.           *
    *                                                                         *
    * Last updated: April 1998                                                *
    *                                                                         *
    * Newsgroups: comp.emulators.apple2, alt.emulators.ibmpc.apple2, *.answers*
    * Posted: First week of each month or on demand.                          *
    *                                                                         *
    * http://purl.org/net/Apple2                                              *
    * ftp://rtfm.mit.edu/pub/usenet/news.answers/apple2/emulators-faq/part1   *
    * http://www.faqs.org/faqs/apple2/emulators-faq/part1/                    *
    * http://www.cs.ruu.nl/wais/html/na-dir/apple2/emulators-faq/part1.html   *
    *                                                                         *
    ***************************************************************************
    

    (An “*” represents new information – new versions do not constitute new information)

    Contents

    Introduction

    What is an emulator?

    An emulator is a virtual-copy of a physical device (in terms of this document, an 8-bit or 16-bit Apple computer). Early home computers contained a number of basic hardware components – the ROM (hard-coded software, like a computer-game cartridge), the RAM (writeable application memory) and the CPU (the microprocessor which executes machine-language programs). The original instruction-set of the Apple’s CPU is duplicated at the core of the emulator as software, and around this is built further emulation of storage devices (usually disk-drives) and translation so that the virtual-machine can use your physical computer’s keyboard, display screen, RAM and sound features. Along with a software copy of the ROM (see below) the emulator can use the resources of your physical computer to mimic an Apple!

    If the concept of emulation sounds too good to be true – that’s probably because it is. Emulators can use a large percentage of your physical computer’s resources during operation. Efficient emulation of the Apple on modern machines is really only possible because of the expanding power of computers. At this point, it takes the processing power of a 486DX2/66 or 68030 CPU to comfortably emulate a 1MHz 6502 (the CPU of the 8-bit Apple ][). The 16-bit IIgs emulators coming into use now need the latest processors (Pentium or PowerPC chips).

    What are disk-images?

    Apple II 5.25″ diskettes are not compatible with that 5.25″ floppy in the front of your PC. Period.

    A disk-image is a track-by-track copy of a physical diskette made to a fixed volume as a software file; basically there is little difference between it and a compressed archive (eg. a PKZIP or StuffIt file). In everyday use, this is useful because of a number of factors – an “image” of a diskette retains more information than an archived copy (eg. volume name, original file dates), physical diskettes may become defective, it makes duplication of master-diskettes easier, disk-images can be stored on hard- disks eliminating the need for unwieldy numbers of diskettes, etc. All of the modern computing platforms use disk-images for storing and transferring disks over electronic networks (such as the Internet). Apple distributes its system software in DiskCopy image format (which is compatible with programs such as ShrinkWrap and MountImage allowing the image to be accessed like a real disk from the Finder). The PC uses WinImage (which is compatible with DiskCopyFast in DOS). Finally, the Amiga uses DiskMasher images. None of these image types are compatible with each other.

    Emulators use disk-images for a totally different purpose. Whereas modern computers use images to transfer physical diskettes electronically, emulators use disk-images because the original media is not compatible with the modern disk drives. Although the diskette media itself is the same, the method used to store data on it is totally different. Disk-images are used to trick the emulator software into thinking that there is an Apple ][ disk-drive attached (unlike modern software, most Apple ][ applications could not be installed onto a hard-drive and were dependent on the 140K diskette structure to operate). Unlike the different types of images above, emulator images can be used on any computer. There are six types of Apple ][ disk-images, of which three are standard to virtually every emulator on every platform… But why have more than one type of disk-image to emulate an Apple disk-drive? Because any disk-drive can access the information on a diskette in a number of ways. An Apple ][ drive alone supports DOS and ProDOS structuring, as well as a Nibble format which included half and quarter tracks used in some software as copy-protection. These are the three main types which are standard to most emulators.

    For further information on disk-images, please refer to Chapter 6 of this guide.

    The Apple ROMs

    According to the ‘Apple II User’s Guide’, the read-only memory (ROM) “contents never change, even when you turn the power off. ROM contains the programs which give the Apple II its unique identity and enables it to understand and respond appropriately to the commands you type in at the keyboard.” (p.4) Every computer contains ROMs, and understandably, they are copyrighted by the manufacturer. As such, many of the emulator packages listed below do not include the ROMs required to emulate an Apple ][. ROMs can be duplicated from your original Apple computer in the form of binary files – usually the Apple, disk-drive and serial ROMs. Instructions for saving the information from the ROMs into binary files can be found in the text file “dumping-ROMs” available on wilbur. Emulator packages which do not include the ROMs often include instructions on dumping ROMs. This information is specifically indicated in the descriptions below. As an aside, the main Apple ROMs are included on the original DOS3.3 System Master Disk, in the “FPBASIC” and “INTBASIC” machine language files.

    ftp://wilbur.stanford.edu/pub/apple2/dumping-ROMs

    There are some ROM files available from the following addresses (legally you may only use these ROM files if you own a corresponding Apple computer): ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/apple.rom

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/apple2o.rom.

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/apple_II+_rom.zip

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/apple_IIc_rom.zip

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/apple_IIe_rom.zip

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/appleIIgs_rom01.zip

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/GSRom01.zip

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/gsrom03.zip

    Apple Emulators

    The SHORT DESCRIPTION is intended only as a general guide; refer to the documentation that comes with each package for the complete technical information. The DISK-IMAGE FORMATS are explained in Chapter 6.

    IMPORTANT NOTE ABOUT FTP.APPLE.ASIMOV.NET: The files in /pub/apple_II/incoming/ directory are now locked to prevent download. Files will become “downloadable” after they have been moved into the normal file hierarchy.

    IMPORTANT NOTE ABOUT WILBUR.STANFORD.EDU (AKA FOGHORN.STANFORD.EDU): This site is down – some of the files listed in this guide were only available from wilbur. If you require any of these files, please email <alexm@zip.com.au> with your request. Due to download limits on my website, they cannot be made available.

    General Emulator-Related Files

    APL2BMP – Small MSDOS executable which converts Apple ][ screen-dumps (BSAVE FILE,A$2000,L$2000) to Windows bitmaps (*.BMP), by Arthur Levesque <backslash@erols.com>. Source code is available by request.

    http://www.erols.com/backslash/binary/apl2bmp.zip

    APS2BMP – Small MSDOS executable which converts Apple ][ Print Shop graphics files into monochrome 88×52 Windows bitmaps (*.BMP), by Arthur Levesque <backslash@erols.com>. Source code is available by request.

    http://www.erols.com/backslash/binary/aps2bmp.zip

    ASB2TXT – Small MSDOS executable which converts AppleSoft BASIC files (after they’ve been transferred to the MS-DOS environment) to ASCII text, by Arthur Levesque <backslash@erols.com>. Source code is available by request.

    http://www.erols.com/backslash/binary/asb2txt.zip

    AP2IFC – Pascal source and MSDOS executable which extracts Infocom data from disk-images, by Steve Hugg <hugg@pobox.com>.

    ftp://ftp.gmd.de/if-archive/infocom/tools/ap2ifc.zip

    AP2INF – ANSI C source and MSDOS executable written to extract data from disk-images of Infocom adventure games, by Stephen Tjasink <stjasink@cs.uct.ac.za>.

    ftp://ftp.gmd.de/if-archive/infocom/tools/ap2inf14.zip (v1.4)

    SPEED.TEST – Disk-image containing a small program to test (and benchmark) emulator performance, by William Night <wnight@wimsey.com>.

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/utility/spedtest.zip (v1.0)

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/utility/spdt222.zip (v2.2.2)

    Timer Module – Add-on which times Speed Test on the Macintosh emulator STM.

    ftp://cassandra.ucr.edu/pub/apple2/timer.sit.hqx

    Apple Macintosh Platform

    HINT: Having trouble transferring files from a Macintosh to a ProDOS disk with PC Exchange? Try setting the file?s creator to ?pdos? and the type to ‘BINA’ using ResEdit (or install the Snitch extension to allow filetype altering in Finder “Get Info” windows). This will prevent the creation of a forked file on the ProDOS disk (ie. it will transfer the data fork only, and not the Macintosh resource fork). It should not be necessary to change the ProDOS file type further if the file is a disk-image or ShrinkIt archive. If the file is text, substitute the file type ‘TEXT’ for ‘BINA’.

    Bernie ][ The Rescue – formerly Fast Eddie

    HOMEPAGE:

    http://www.bernie.gs/Bernie/

    AVAILABILITY: Shareware, available for free download from:

    http://www.bernie.gs/Download/Parts/bernie13consumer.html

    http://www.bernie.gs/Download/Parts/bernie13dev.html (special version with debugging tools for Apple IIgs software development)

    Older versions as below:

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/fast_eddie/fasteddie1.0b2.sit

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/fast_eddie/fasteddie.sit.hqx (1.0b1)

    ftp://ftp.uni-kl.de/pub/apple2/emulators/FastEddie1b1.hqx

    NOTE: Bernie ][ The Rescue is Shareware; registration costs $25 (US). Educational institutions: US$15 per license, lab & site license available

    AUTHOR: Andre Horstmann <andre.horstmann@unifr.ch> and Henrik Gudat <gudath@ubaclu.unibas.ch>, F.E.Systems (formerly Bright Software).

    Contacts: <woof@kagi.com> technical support, <emutech@magnet.ch> corporate/media/registration.

    STATUS: Development in progress.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: Bernie ][ The Rescue is a software-only Apple IIGS emulator, closely integrated to the MacOS (optimized for the Power Macintosh) and capable of running both Apple ][ and 16-bit IIGS software. The package includes a superfast 65816 emulator in hand-crafted PowerPC assembly. Bernie supports all graphic modes, 32 channel stereo sound, up to 2 joysticks and mouse emulation (incl. direct GamePad/MouseStick support), cached 3.5″ IWM emulation (read & write), 5.25″ disk support, and text printing through “InkMeister” (cross-platform printing through MacOS printer architecture) and direct printing with InkDirect. With the introduction of version 1.3, Bernie is the only emulation software that can run Wolfenstein 3D, Diversi-Tune/GS, and most notably telecommunications software (registration required) such as ProTerm, ReadyLink, AppleWorks GS/telecomm. Bernie features a very low memory and disk footprint. Bernie is shareware ($25) and can be registered through Kagi <

    http://order.kagi.com/?XF>. We support by e-mail <woof@kagi.com> or via newsgroups comp.emulators.apple2 and Delphi’s Apple II forum/message board.

    http://www.bernie.gs/Bernie/Specifications/index.html

    ROMS: Bernie ][ The Rescue does not come with the necessary IIGS version 1 or 3 ROMs. Instructions are included in the “Fast Eddie Readme” file for saving the ROMs. To use choose between both ROM01 and ROM03 images, name the ROM dumps “APPLE2GS.ROM” and “APPLE2GS.ROM2” respectively and select the required ROM from the Setup menu.

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/appleIIgs_rom01. zip

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/GSRom01.zip

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/gsrom03.zip

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: DiskCopy, universal (“2img”), raw, and real ProDOS disks via the SuperDrive.

    DISK-IMAGE RESOURCE INFO:
          File Creator: 'B2TR', File Type: 'DOS3' (5.25" images)
          File Creator: 'B2TR', File Type: 'DSK5' (5.25" images)
          File Creator: 'B2TR', File Type: 'PDOS' (5.25" images)
          File Creator: 'B2TR', File Type: 'NIBL' (5.25" nibble)
          File Creator: 'B2TR', File Type: 'VDSK' (Proprietary)
          File Creator: 'B2TR', File Type: '2img' (2img universal)
          File Creator: 'B2TR, File Type: 'dImg' (DiskCopy 4.2)
          File Creator: 'B2TR, File Type: 'dimg' (DiskCopy 6)
    

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: PowerPC-equipped Mac, 4.5Mb free RAM (this includes about 1.5Mb RAM for the virtual IIgs), and MacOS 7.5.3 or better. Appearance manager strongly recommended. Some features available in registered version only (communications support). Versions prior to Warp 5 require the DrawSprocket extension. Versions 1.0 and higher do not require DrawSprocket.

    http://www.unsupported.com/Files/Release/DrawSprocket.sit.bin

    FURTHER REFERENCE: “Release Notes” (file included in the archive). Further documentation available from the homepage.

    http://www.bernie.gs/Bernie/Documentation (online manual)

    http://www.bernie.gs/Bernie/Download (download area)

    http://www.bernie.gs/Support (tutorials & FAQs)

    http://www.bernie.gs/ (F.E.Systems home page)

    (Thanks to Henrik Gudat for email about this emulator. – Alex)

    Catakig (version 1.10a2)

    HOMEPAGE:

    http://purl.org/net/Catakig/

    AVAILABILITY: Available for free download from:

    http://www.access.digex.net/~cklipsch/stage/ctkg110a2.hqx

    Older versions as below:

    http://www.access.digex.net/~cklipsch/stage/catakig103.hqx

    http://hyperarchive.lcs.mit.edu/HyperArchive/Archive/app/catakig-103.hqx

    http://www.access.digex.net/~cklipsch/stage/catakig103b.sit.bin

    http://hyperarchive.lcs.mit.edu/HyperArchive/Archive/app/catakig-103b.hqx

    http://www.access.digex.net/~cklipsch/stage/catakig102.sit.bin

    ftp://apple2.caltech.edu/pub/apple2/emulators/catakig102.sit

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/catakig/catakig102.sit.bin

    ftp://ftp.unsw.edu.au/pub/mac/emulators/apple/apple-ii-emulators/catakig-102.hqx

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/catakig/catakig102b.sit.bin

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/catakig/catakig101.sit.bin

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/catakig/catakig100b3.sit.bin

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/catakig/catakig100b2.sit.bin

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/catakig/catakig100b.sit.bin

    AUTHOR: Colin Klipsch <cklipsch@access.digex.net>.

    STATUS: Development in progress.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: Catakig emulates a 64K Apple ][/][+ and a 128K //e, allowing multiple emulator windows to be opened at once. The emulator includes full sound support and all Apple video modes, as well as ProDOS hard-disk volumes and disk-image read/write.

    ROMS: Catakig does not come with the necessary ROMs. The missing ROMs are the main Apple ROMs “APPLE2.ROM”, “APPLE2P.ROM” and “APPLE2E.ROM”) – depending on the type of Apple emulated.

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/apple_II_rom.zip

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/apple_II+_rom.zip

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/apple_IIe_rom.zip

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: DOS3.3 Order (DO – size: 143360 bytes), Nibblized Dos Order (NDO – size: 232960 bytes) and a proprietary compressed format. Virtual ProDOS hard-disk volumes are also supported.

    DISK-IMAGE RESOURCE INFO:
          File Creator: 'Ctkg', File Type: 'A2D5' (5.25" images)
          File Creator: 'Ctkg', File Type: 'A2D3' (3.5" images)
          File Creator: 'Ctkg', File Type: 'A2DH' (hard-drive)
    

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: PowerPC Macintosh running System 7 and above, with QuickTime installed.

    FURTHER REFERENCE: “Read Me” (file included in the archive).

    Deja ][ (version 1.0)

    HOMEPAGE:

    http://www.hypermall.com/ego/Mac/HTML/deja.ii.html

    AVAILABILITY: Commercial product, available from JEM Software for US$79.95.

              JEM Software
              7578 Lamar Ct.
              Arvada, CO 80003.
              Fax: 303-422-4856
              Email: rbJEM@aol.com
    

    AUTHOR: Randy Brandt <rbJEM@aol.com> & Mike Munz <munz@wordperfect.com>.

    STATUS: Development in progress.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: An AppleWorks emulator for 68K and PPC Macintoshes – literally, an “Apple II emulation engine”, which requires AppleWorks 5. > From a post on “comp.sys.apple2”: “It supports most TimeOut applications, including UltraMacros. It also tightly integrates AppleWorks 5 and the Mac environment. This includes automatic conversion between Macintosh and AppleWorks clipboards, being able to traverse through your Macintosh hard disk (no Prodos partition required), and macro commands to access Mac functions (like speaking text, dialing). And if you have PCExchange (or System 7.5), it will read Apple II 3.5″ disks as well. It, however, is not a generic emulator”.

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: 68K or PowerPC Macintosh running System 7 and above; AppleWorks 5.

    FURTHER REFERENCE: None.

    Gus

    HOMEPAGE:

    http://users.ids.net/~kerwood/gus.html

    AVAILABILITY: Commercial product under development; screen shots at:

    http://www.cs.csubak.edu/~jstiles/emulator/apple2/

    AUTHOR: Dave Lyons and Andy Nicholas (Apple Computer, Inc.)

    STATUS: Pre-release.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: Gus is an Apple in-house project which should allow fully transparent IIgs emulation on Macintosh. Apparently, the emulation speed is quite fast, working approximately four to five times the speed of a real IIgs if speed regulation is turned off.

    ROMS: N/A.

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: Unknown.

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: Unknown.

    FURTHER REFERENCE: None.

    Mac Apple //e Emulator – MacE (version 0.80)

    AVAILABILITY: Available for free download from:

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/IIe/MacE.compiled.sit.bin

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/misc/emsrc.sit (source code)

    AUTHOR: W. Sheldon Simms III <sheldon@atlcom.net>.

    STATUS: Source code released for public modification.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: An Apple //e emulator for 68K Macintoshes. The binhexed Think C 7.0 code was posted to “comp.emulators.apple2” on 5 July 1995. According to the author’s accompanying message, it is an “emulator that boots into basic. I don’t have time to work on it now so I’m posting the source in case anyone else wants to mess with it. It has a 65816 emulator (well 65802 really)…There’s no documentation other than internal documentation.”

    ROMS: MacE comes with the necessary Apple //e ROMs and is ready for use after decompression.

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: DOS3.3 order (DO – size: 143360 bytes); there also seems to be an Icon resource for virtual hard-disk volumes in the code, but whether or not this is supported is unknown.

    DISK-IMAGE RESOURCE INFO:
          File Creator: 'MacE', File Type: 'DSK5' (5.25" images)
          File Creator: 'MacE', File Type: 'DSKB' (hard-drive)
    

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: “Desktop” (colour) Macintosh – including Power Macintosh models. Will not work on “compact” (B&W) Macintoshes.

    FURTHER REFERENCE: None.

    Sara (version 0.2.0)

    HOMEPAGE:

    http://www.access.digex.net/~cps/sss15.html

    AVAILABILITY: Available for free download from:

    ftp://ftp.access.digex.net/pub/access/cps/pub/Sara68K.sit.hqx (68K)

    ftp://ftp.access.digex.net/pub/access/cps/pub/SaraPPC.sit.hqx (PPC)

    AUTHOR: Chris Smolinski <cps@access.digex.net>.

    STATUS: Development in progress.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: Sara emulates an Apple ///, with four virtual disk- drives. According to the documentation, the emulator is currently at an extremely preliminary version – there is no writing to floppies, no ProFile hard-drive support and a problem with running programs.

    ROMS: N/A.

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: Sara DO image format (DO – size: 143360 bytes).

    DISK-IMAGE RESOURCE INFO: File Creator: ‘SARA’, File Type: ‘DSK5’ (5.25″ images)

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: Colour 680×0 or Power Macintosh.

    FURTHER REFERENCE: “ReadMe” (file included in the archive).

    Sim6502 (version 0.1d)

    AVAILABILITY: Available for free download from:

    http://www.emulation.net/apple1/sim6502.sit.hqx

    ftp://ftp.unsw.edu.au/pub/mac/emulators/apple/apple-i-emulator/sim6502.hqx

    AUTHOR: Achim Breidenbach <achim@boinx.com>.

    STATUS: Development in progress.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: Sim6502 emulates an Apple I, and was developed to commemorate the works of Steven Wozniak. Although the Apple I does not have a BASIC interpreter, there are several sample codes included in the archive. The 6502 decimal mode is not emulated.

    ROMS: N/A.

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: N/A.

    DISK-IMAGE RESOURCE INFO: N/A.

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: Power Macintosh models.

    FURTHER REFERENCE: An HTML version of the original Apple I Operation Manual is included in the archive. An online version of the manual is available from:

    http://www.emulation.net/apple1/manual/apple1manx.html

    Stop The Madness – STM (version 0.851r)

    AVAILABILITY: Available for free download from:

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/stm/STM_0.851r.sit

    ftp://ftp.uni-kl.de/pub/apple2/mac/0.851r.sea.bin

    ftp://ftp.unsw.edu.au/pub/mac/emulators/apple/apple-ii-emulators/stm-0851r.hqx

    AUTHOR: Kevin Lund <kevin@locutus.ucr.edu> & Jim Nitchals <jimn8@netcom.com>.

    STATUS: See STM v0.881r.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: Stop The Madness emulates a 64K Apple ][+, and allows disk-swapping. Although it cannot “save” (write information to a disk image) a small program called Save The Madness can be used simultaneously with STM (under Multifinder or System 7), writing altered disk-image files (see below). STM comes with the DOS 3.3 System Master disk-image “pre- installed” into virtual drive one.

    ROMS: STM comes with the necessary Apple ][+ ROMs and is ready for use after decompression.

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: DOS3.3 order (DO – size: 143360 bytes).

    DISK-IMAGE RESOURCE INFO:

    File Creator: ‘A2EM’, File Type: ‘DSK5’ (5.25″ images)

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: “Desktop” (colour) Macintosh – including Power Macintosh models. Runs ONLY in 256-colours! Will not display a picture on “compact” (B&W) Macintoshes.

    NOTE: On desktop Macintoshes, you must set the “Colors” control panel to 256-colors, as STM does not support higher colour modes. This problem has erroneously been interpreted as non-compatibility of the emulator with some Macintoshes.

    FURTHER REFERENCE: “docs 0.85” (DOCMaker file included in the archive), and “docs” (DOCMaker file included in the “Disks-n-Docs0.81.hqx” archive.

    ftp://ftp.uni-kl.de/pub/apple2/mac/Disks-n-Docs0.81.hqx

    RELATED FILES:

    Save The Madness – Application which adds write access to STM disk-images. Includes source.

    ftp://ftp.uni-kl.de/pub/apple2/mac/SaveTM_1.02.sit.bin

    Stop The Madness – STM (version 0.881r)

    AVAILABILITY: Available for free download from:

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/stm/STM_0.881r.sit

    ftp://apple2.caltech.edu/pub/apple2/emulators/stm0.881r.sit

    ftp://ftp.unsw.edu.au/pub/mac/emulators/apple/apple-ii-emulators/stm-0.881.hqx

    AUTHOR: Kevin Lund <kevin@locutus.ucr.edu> & Jim Nitchals <jimn8@netcom.com>.

    STATUS: Unknown.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: Stop The Madness emulates a 64K Apple ][+, and allows disk-swapping. Version 0.881r (formerly known as 0.872d) is far more versatile than the previous version; configurable “modules” allow expansion limited only by available memory – for example, STM can support four Disk II drives. Additionally, STM can now “save” disk-images (see below). STM comes with the DOS 3.3 System Master disk-image “pre-installed” into virtual drive one.

    ROMS: STM comes with the necessary Apple ][+ ROMs and is ready for use after decompression.

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: DOS3.3 order (DO – size: 143360 bytes), and non-standard “pre-nibbleized”. This second type is the only format the Disk II module will save images into. From the documentation: “this format is bulkier than the ‘.DSK’ format, and has no cross-platform compatibility, but is more flexible, allowing non-standard formats and 1/4 track resolution.” Version 1.00 of SaveTM (see below) is also compatible with STM 0.881r for those who prefer standard disk-image output.

    DISK-IMAGE RESOURCE INFO: File Creator: ‘A2EM’, File Type: ‘DSK5’ (5.25″ images)

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: “Desktop” (colour) Macintosh – including Power Macintosh models – with System 7. Runs ONLY in 256-colours! Will not display a picture on “compact” (B&W) Macintoshes.

    NOTE: On desktop Macintoshes, you must set the “Colors” control panel to 256-colors, as STM does not support higher colour modes. This problem has erroneously been interpreted as non-compatibility of the emulator with some Macintoshes.

    FURTHER REFERENCE: “STM 0.881r docs” (DOCMaker file included in the archive). Online documentation is also provided.

    http://www.ecnet.net/users/mumbv/pages/STMdoc.html

    RELATED FILES:

    Cassette speaker module for STM.

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/utility/speaker_cass_for_STM/cassettespeaker.sit

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/utility/speaker_cass_for_STM/speaker.bin

    Disk ][ replacement module for STM.

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/utility/formattingdiskII.sit

    Save The Madness – Application which adds write access to STM disk-images. Includes source.

    ftp://cassandra.ucr.edu/pub/apple2/incoming/SaveTM_1.00_for0.881r.sit.bin

    IIe (version 3.01)

    HOMEPAGE:

    http://www-personal.usyd.edu.au/~vtan/sw/index.html

    AVAILABILITY: Shareware, available for free download from: http://www-personal.usyd.edu.au/~vtan/sw/IIe/IIe_3.0.1.sit.hqx

    ftp://ftp.unsw.edu.au/pub/mac/emulators/apple/apple-ii-emulators/iie-301.hqx

    Older versions as below:

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/IIe/IIe_3.0.sit.hqx

    ftp://apple2.caltech.edu/pub/apple2/emulators/iie.3.0.sit

    ftp://ftp.unsw.edu.au/pub/mac/emulators/apple/apple-ii-emulators/iie-201.hqx

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/IIe/IIe_1.0.sit.bin

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/IIe/Mac_IIe_1.0.sit.hqx

    NOTE: IIe is Shareware; registration costs $25 (US).

    AUTHOR: Vincent Tan <VincentTan@kagi.com> & Victor Tan.

    STATUS: Development in progress.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: IIe emulates an Apple //e. Excerpted from the text file: “IIe is a fully functional Apple //e emulator that supports all of the graphics modes, all of the Apple //e keyboard keys, and all of the currently available Apple II disk image formats. You can even access your 3.5″ Apple II disks from your Mac’s floppy disk drive! This version can also access any ProDOS partitions on your Mac’s hard disk, and it can even save ProDOS files directly in any of your Mac’s folders!” From the WWW page: “The next version will have sound card support. There is no expected date of release at this time.”

    ROMS: IIe does not come with the necessary Apple //e ROMs. The missing ROM is the main Apple ROM (“APPLE2E.ROM”). The instructions suggest using ApplePC’s //e ROM:

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/apple_IIe_rom.zip

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: DOS3.3 order (DO – size: 143360 bytes); the emulator can also read 3.5″ ProDOS disks directly from the Macintosh 800K/1.44Mb drive(s). 3.5″ disk-images (Apple images in Apple DiskCopy format AND plain ProDOS-order images) and virtual hard-drive (.HDV) files are also supported.

    DISK-IMAGE RESOURCE INFO:
          File Creator: 'AIIe', File Type: 'DSK5' (5.25" images)
          File Creator: 'AIIe', File Type: 'DSK3' (3.5" images)
          File Creator: 'AIIe', File Type: 'dImg' (DiskCopy)
          File Creator: 'AIIe', File Type: 'HDV ' (hard-drive)
    

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: “Desktop” (colour) Macintosh – including Power Macintosh models – with System 7.0 (with QuickTime and Thread Manager) or higher (System 7.5 recommended). Runs in most display modes (1-bit B&W and 4-bit colour) EXCEPT 16-bit and 24-bit colour. Will not work on “compact” (B&W) Macintoshes.

    FURTHER REFERENCE: “1. Read me first”, “2. Instructions”, “3. Configuring IIe” and “4. Other stuff” (Text files included in the archive).

    //e Card for Macintosh LC

    AVAILABILITY: Commercial product, no longer in production.

    AUTHOR: Apple Computer.

    STATUS: Development ceased.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: The LC //e Card is a combination hardware/software package which emulates an enhanced Apple //e, accelerated to 1.9 Mhz, monochrome, colour or inverse video, custom beep sound, RAM card, two super serial cards, a “printer” card (spools to Chooser device), clock, SmartPort card, AppleTalk card, Mouse card and extended 80-column card. Hardware is attached via a special connector with ports for a 9-pin joystick and a SmartPort drive (up to two 5.25″ and one 3.5″). Files can easily be transferred between Macintosh and ProDOS hard-disk partitions using standard drag-and-drop copying (file copied to the ProDOS partition appear on fixed volume within the emulator). The problem of creating “forked files” is avoided by using the Resource Info below. Further installation, use and troubleshooting articles are available from the Apple Technical Information Library (search for “iie”).

    http://www.info.apple.com/til.html

    The latest software for the card is available under copyright from the Apple FTP site. ftp://ftp.info.apple.com /Apple.Support.Area/Apple.Software.Updates/US/Apple_II/For_Macintosh/ Apple_IIe_Card_2.2.1.sea.hqx

    ftp://ftp.info.apple.com /Apple.Support.Area/Apple.Software.Updates/US/Apple_II/For_Macintosh/ IIe_Startup_2.2.2d1.sea.hqx

    ROMS: N/A.

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: N/A. The card actually runs original software on 5.25″ or 3.5″ diskette, although it can be used to create disk-images for use with other emulators.

    PRODOS FILE RESOURCE INFO:
          File Creator: 'pdos', File Type: 'BINA' (ProDOS binary)
          File Creator: 'pdos', File Type: 'TEXT' (text file)
    

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: Macintosh LC with PDS slot supporting 24-bit adressing, including the LC, LCII, LCIII, Color Classic, Color Classic II, LC 520, LC 550, LC 475/Quadra 605, LC 575 and the Performa 4xx and 5xx lines except the Quadra 630, LC/Performa 580 and 5200/75 LC.

    FURTHER REFERENCE: N/A.

    (The preceding information on the //e Card was obtained from information sent by Ivan Drucker <drucker@lclark.edu>).

    ][ in a Mac (version 2.53)

    AVAILABILITY: Commercial product, no longer in production.

    AUTHOR: COMPUTER:applications 12813 Lindeley Drive Raleigh, NC 27614.

    STATUS: Development ceased.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: ][ in a Mac is a package which emulates an Apple //e. Functionally, it is probably similar to it’s PC counterpart, “][ in a PC” (see below) with the following exceptions: it runs at sixty percent of the standard //e speed (on a MacPlus), uses only a portion of the Mac screen, has no colour support and limited graphics, no “real” joystick, doesn’t handle copy-protected software, and can create problems with keyboard translation and modem port detection on some Macintoshes.

    ROMS: N/A.

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: ProDOS3.3 Order (PO – size: 143360 bytes); the emulator can also read 3.5″ ProDOS disks (usually 800K) directly from the Macintosh internal or external drive(s).

    DISK-IMAGE RESOURCE INFO: File Creator: ‘CAI1’, File Type: ‘DISK’ (5.25″ images)

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: MacPlus or SE. Some older versions of the software didn’t run on the Mac II line. The software will not display colour even on colour Macintosh systems.

    FURTHER REFERENCES: “][inamac.txt” (Review text file on wilbur).

    ftp://wilbur.stanford.edu/pub/emulators/apple2/][inamac.txt

    RELATED FILES:

    Image Converter – Disk-image converter by Lazarus I. Long which converts between ProDOS (][ in a Mac), DOS3.3 and Copy ][+ 7.1 image formats.

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/utility/ic.sit

    (Thanks to Gaku Tomiyama for information on the disk-image format. – Alex)

    XGS-Mac (version 0.50r3)

    HOMEPAGE:

    http://www.cen.uiuc.edu/~m-bytnar/XGS-Mac/

    AVAILABILITY: Available for free download from:

    http://www.students.uiuc.edu/~m-bytnar/XGS-Mac/xgs-mac0.50r3_68K.sit.hqx (68K)

    http://www.students.uiuc.edu/~m-bytnar/XGS-Mac/xgs-mac0.50r3_PPC.sit.hqx (PPC)

    http://www.jurai.org/~funaho/emulators/XGS/xgs-0.53-src.tar.gz (beta source code)

    http://www.jurai.org/~funaho/emulators/XGS/xgs-0.50-src.tar.gz (source code)

    Older versions as below:

    http://www.students.uiuc.edu/~m-bytnar/XGS-Mac/xgs-mac0.50r2_PPC.sit.hqx (PPC)

    http://www.students.uiuc.edu/~m-bytnar/XGS-Mac/xgs-mac0.50r1_68K.sit.hqx (68K)

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/xgs/xgs-mac0.47r3_68K.sit.hqx (68K)

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/xgs/xgs-mac0.47r3_PPC.sit.hqx (PPC)

    AUTHOR: Joshua M. Thompson <funaho@jurai.org>; Mac version ported and maintained by Michael Bytnar <m-bytnar@uiuc.edu>.

    STATUS: Development in progress. Check the mailing list for further information (email <majordomo@jurai.org> with the words “subscribe xgs- list” in the body of the letter) or the development mailing list (email <majordomo@jurai.org> with the words “subscribe xgs-dev” in the body of the letter). Announcements of the latest version of XGS-Mac are available from:

    http://internetter.com/titan/macemu/index.html.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: XGS emulates a ROM01 or ROM03 Apple IIGS, with the following features: CPU and memory map emulation, graphics modes up to super high resolution, ADB keyboard, clock chip, battery RAM, IWM hardware emulation for Slot 5 & 6 drives, ProDOS block device in Slot 7 and classic Apple ][ sound. Further IIGS features such as Ensoniq sound and GS/OS 6 capacity will be added in future releases.

    ROMS: XGS does not come with the necessary ROMs. The emulator requires a copy of the Apple IIGS ROM03 – these ROMs can be copied from your Apple IIGS by following the procedures in the “README” text file included with the package.

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/xgs.rom

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: 2IMG universal format, from version 0.50. From version 0.50 onwards the previous proprietary image type is no longer supported. The archive includes a utility named “imgconv” to convert disk-images from the previous type into XGS image files.

    DISK-IMAGE RESOURCE INFO: File Creator: ‘xgs!’, File Type: ‘2img’ (2img universal)

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: “Higher end” 68K “desktop” (colour) Macintosh with FPU or PowerPC Macintosh with 6Mb RAM, extended keyboard and 1-20Mb of free hard-disk space. Versions 0.50r2 and higher require the DrawSprocket extension.

    http://www.unsupported.com/Files/Release/DrawSprocket.sit.bin

    FURTHER REFERENCES: “README” (Text file included in the archive) and “The Official XGS FAQ (version 1.3)”.

    http://www.jurai.org/~funaho/emulators/XGS/xgsfaq13.txt

    RELATED FILES:

    Image Utilities for XGS-DOS v0.50 – A Macintosh port of “imageconv” and “imageutil” are provided in the XGS-Mac archive. These are basically identical in operation to their MS-DOS counterparts.

    ROMverify – An application which validates the XGS.ROM file. It is included in the XGS-Mac archive.

    “Using .SHK Files on an XGS” – Two-part article on using *.SHK and *.BSC files with XGS, by Bruce E. Fleury <bfleury@mailhost.tcs.tulane.edu>.

    ftp://ground.isca.uiowa.edu/apple2/Faqs/emul.dsk

    ftp://ground.isca.uiowa.edu/apple2/Faqs/emul2.dsk

    Apple Newton Platform

    TwoInHand

    AVAILABILITY: Under development; Freeware.

    AUTHOR: Peter Liethen <pliethen@globaldialog.com>.

    STATUS: Alpha testing.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: TwoInHand emulates a 128K Apple //c, with dual 5.25″ floppies, modem and printer ports. Joystick, mouse and keyboard options depend upon the Newton configuration. Sound is fully emulated with a lag.

    ROMS: Unknown.

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: Non-standard (size: 160 kilobytes).

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: Newton PDA, with 452K of free space for the program, 150K free heap space and 160K per disk-image.

    FURTHER REFERENCE: None.

    Atari Platform

    Apple ][ A2.04

    AVAILABILITY: Available for free download from:

    ftp://atari.archive.umich.edu/atari/Emulators/appleemu.arc – SEE UMICH MIRRORS

    ftp://ftp.uni-kl.de/pub/apple2/atari/appleemu.arc

    ftp://ftp.wustl.edu/systems/atari/umich.edu/Emulators/appleemu.arc

    ftp://ground.isca.uiowa.edu/apple2/Emulators/appleemu.arc

    ftp://nic.switch.ch/mirror/atari/Emulators/appleemu.arc

    AUTHOR: Darek Mihocka.

    STATUS: Unknown (date on readme file: Dec. 31, 1986).

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: An Apple ][ emulator for the Atari ST. Excerpted from the documentation: “it can be used as a tool to learn 6502 machine language, but also, it allows the ST to run Apple…software.”

    ROMS: Apple ][ does not include the necessary ROMS – they must be copied from your Apple and titled “APPLSOFT.BIN” and “INTBASIC.BIN”.

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/apple.rom

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: N/A. Binary files must be transferred from the Apple ][ and then converted using a source code program from Apple monitor hex dump into an Atari DOS (.BIN) format.

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: Atari ST with 512K, colour or monochrome.

    FURTHER REFERENCE: “EMULATOR.DOC” (Text file included in the archive).

    RELATED FILES:

    Disk Server – A disk-image server for the Atari 1040 ST, written in OMICRON BASIC, by Peter Koch <pkoch@kiss.de>. It serves four disk-images over a serial null modem line to an Apple II.

    ftp://ground.isca.uiowa.edu/apple2/Emulators/disk.server.tar.Z

    BeOS/BeBox Platform

    Open Bernie for Be (version 0.5d1)

    HOMEPAGE:

    http://www.bernie.gs/Bernie/Be/index.html

    AVAILABILITY: Available for free download from:

    http://www.bernie.gs/Bernie/Be/bernie.tar.gz

    AUTHOR: Andre Horstmann <andre.horstmann@unifr.ch>, F.E.Systems (formerly Bright Software).

    STATUS: Development in progress.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: Open Bernie is a BeOS version of the Power Macintosh Bernie ][ The Rescue, and emulates an Apple IIGS (ROM 01/03 depending upon ROM-file version). From the “Readme” file in the archive, “it therefore features an ultrafast CPU emulation kernel written entirely in handcrafted PPC assembly language. Bernie is also known for its extremely high compatibility level, running virtually every Apple II+/IIe or IIgs program.”

    ROMS: Open Bernie does not come with the necessary IIGS version 1 or 3 ROMs.

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/appleIIgs_rom01.zip

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/GSRom01.zip

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/gsrom03.zip

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: DOS3.3, ProDOS, 2IMG universal format, DiskCopy, raw data disk-images and harddrive files.

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: BeOS compatible PowerPC Macintosh.

    FURTHER REFERENCE: “Read me – or crash!” (Text file included in the archive).

    Sargalo (version 0.11)

    AVAILABILITY: Available for free download from:

    ftp://ground.isca.uiowa.edu/apple2/Emulators/A2.BeBox.Emu.tar.gz

    AUTHOR: Kevin Lund <kevin@locutus.ucr.edu>.

    STATUS: Development in progress.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: Sargalo emulates an Apple ][+, running under 8-bit video on a BeOS compatible PowerMac.

    ROMS: Sargalo comes with necessary Apple ][+ ROMs and is ready for use after decompression.

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: DOS3.3 order (DO – size: 143360 bytes).

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: BeOS compatible PowerPC Macintosh, or BeBox.

    FURTHER REFERENCE: “README” (Text file included in the archive).

    Commodore Amiga Platform

    AppleM (DEMO version)

    AVAILABILITY: Available for free download from:

    ftp://ftp.wustl.edu/systems/amiga/aminet/misc/emu/applemdemo.lha – AMINET & SOME MIRRORS

    AUTHOR: Greg Dunlap <gdunlap@ecst.csuchico.edu>.

    STATUS: Unknown (date on readme file: July 6, 1992).

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: AppleM emulates an Apple ][+ through Rexx C; it supports all Apple display modes, sound, joystick and language card. Additional enhancements are available: lowercase text is displayed and the 6502C instruction set is emulated. There is no disk, modem or printer support.

    ROMS: AppleM does not come with the necessary ROMs. These ROMs can be copied from your old Apple ][ by following the procedures in the “Readme” text file included with the package.

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/apple.rom

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: N/A.

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: Amiga 1000, Amiga 500 and higher running KS1.2.

    FURTHER REFERENCE: “README” (Text file included in the archive).

    RELATED FILES:

    Load RAM – Load Apple 2000 programs into AppleM (Rexx C).

    ftp://ftp.wustl.edu/systems/amiga/aminet/misc/emu/LoadRAM.lha

    Apple On Amiga (version 0.1)

    AVAILABILITY: Available for free download from:

    ftp://ftp.uni-kl.de/pub/apple2/emulators/AppleOnAmiga.tar.Z

    ftp://ftp.wustl.edu/systems/amiga/aminet/misc/emu/AppleOnAmiga.lha – AMINET & SOME MIRRORS

    AUTHOR: Claudio Nieder <claudio@dial.eunet.ch>.

    STATUS: Further development ceased. The author no longer programs on the Amiga.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: Apple on Amiga emulates a 48K Apple ][+, with two disk drives (read/write but not save). It runs BASIC programs at 1/10 the speed of an Apple ][ and disk access can be as slow as 1/60 of an Apple ][. Booting can take five to six minutes. Written in Modula-2.

    ROMS: Apple On Amiga does not come with the necessary ROMs. These ROMs can be copied from your old Apple ][ by following the procedures in the “Readme” text file included with the package (including an uncompiled Apple ][ program which must be transferred).

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/apple.rom

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: Non-standard (size: 230 kilobytes).

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: “Fast” Amiga with Workbench 2.0.4, and 1MB RAM free (such as 25MHZ Amiga 3000).

    FURTHER REFERENCE: “Readme” (Text file included in the archive).

    Apple 2000 (version 1.3)

    AVAILABILITY: Available for free download from:

    ftp://ground.isca.uiowa.edu/apple2/Emulators/Apple2000v13.lha

    ftp://ftp.uni-kl.de/pub/apple2/amiga/Apple2000v13.lha

    ftp://ftp.wustl.edu/systems/amiga/aminet/misc/emu/Apple2000v13.lha – AMINET & MIRRORS

    AUTHOR: Kevin Kralian <Kevin_Kralian@sacbbx.com>.

    STATUS: Further development ceased. The author posted a message to comp.sys.amiga.emulations stating that he will no longer be doing anything for the Amiga, therefore V1.3 is the last version.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: Apple 2000 emulates a 64K Apple ][+, allowing loading (Right-Amiga-L) from and saving (Right-Amiga-S) to DDD Apple compressed disk archives from any Amiga device. All video modes are available (Text, LoRes, HiRes and mixed), along with a two button joystick. Apple 2000 is able to instantly load and run Apple files from any Amiga device (without “disk-booting”). The emulator supports Amiga multi-tasking. Version 1.3 introduces a number of improvements in the emulator; be sure to read the documentation.

    ROMS: Apple 2000 does not come with the necessary ROMs. The missing ROMs are the disk-drive ROMs (“_DISK.ROM”) and main Apple ROMs (“_APPLE.ROM”) – these ROMs can be copied from your old Apple ][ by following the procedures in the “Apple 2000.doc” text file included with the package.

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/apple.rom

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: DDD archives, plain Apple ][ files, raw disk-images (size: 220 kilobytes). It is possible to use standard DOS3.3 order (DO – size: 143360 bytes) images by renaming the 143360 byte disk-image with a *.disk extension.

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: 68020 Amiga with Kickstart 2.0, 1MB RAM and ReqTools.library (by Nico François). Will not work on 68000 Amiga (A500,2000).

    FURTHER REFERENCE: “Apple 2000.doc” (Text file included in the archive).

    Commodore 64 Platform

    Spartan Emulator

    AVAILABILITY: Commercial product, no longer in production.

    AUTHOR: Mimic Systems.

    STATUS: Development ceased.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: The Apple ][ emulator for the Commodore 64 which was advertised as offering 100% Apple emulation and other features, all for the low price of US $595, but which turned out to be a package to transfer and re-compile BASIC programs on the C64.

    ROMS: N/A.

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: N/A.

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: Commodore 64 (with V2.0 BASIC).

    FURTHER REFERENCE: None.

    (The preceding information on the Spartan Emulator was obtained from information sent by Paul Allen Panks <pap@dana.ucc.nau.edu>).

    IBM-PC – Linux OS

    Apple ][+ Emulator for Linux (version 0.05)

    AVAILABILITY: Available for free download from:

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/apple2-emu-linux/apple2- emul-v005-linux.tar.gz

    ftp://sunsite.unc.edu/pub/Linux/Incoming/apple2-emul-v005-linux.tar.gz Older versions as below:

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/apple2-emu-linux/apple2- emul-v004-linux.tar.gz

    ftp://sunsite.unc.edu/pub/Linux/system/emulators/apple2-emul-v004- linux.tar.gz

    ftp://tsx-11.mit.edu/pub/linux/sources/usr.bin/apple2-emul-v004- linux.tar.gz

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/apple2-emu-linux/apple2- emul-v003g-linux.tar.gz

    ftp://apple2.caltech.edu/pub/apple2/emulators/apple2-emul-v002-linux.tar.gz

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/apple2-emu-linux/apple2- emul-v002-linux.tar.gz

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/apple2-emu-linux/apple2- emul-v001-linux.tar.gz

    ftp://ftp.funet.fi/pub/Linux/util/emulators/apple2.tar.gz (v0.00 was distributed under the filename: “apple2.tar.gz”).

    AUTHOR: Alexander Bottema <d91a1bo@meryl.csd.uu.se>; v004 and v005 by Aaron Culliney <chernabog@baldmountain.bbn.com>.

    STATUS: Development in progress.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: Apple ][+ Emulator for Linux “is partly written in 386 (AT&T) assembler and partly in C. You can switch diskettes using a diskette database through an intuitive interface. Furthermore, it is possible to trim the speed of the emulator and it runs in full speed (approximately) twice as fast as an standard Apple II+ on a 486DX-50…[It uses] the svgalib’s key scancodes. I’ve also taken the opportunity to implement the undocumented 6502 instructions. I’ve noticed that at least two games use these undocumented instrucions; Bug Attack and MS Pacman. Currently I have transfered about 40 diskettes to my emulator and all programs/games seem to work” (from a post on “comp.emulators.apple2”). Requires compiling (C source code).

    ROMS: Apple ][+ Emulator for Linux does not come with the necessary Apple ][+ ROMs. The missing ROMs are the main Apple ROM (“apple_II.rom”) and disk-controller ROM (“slot6.rom”) – these ROMs can be copied from your Apple //e by following the instructions in the README file accompanying the archive.

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/apple.rom

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: DOS3.3 order (DO – size: 143360 bytes).

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: SVGA lib version 1.2.9 (or later) – tested under 1.2.10. Kernel 1.0 (or later) – tested under 2.0.28. libc 4.4.4 (or later) – tested under 5.2.18. joystick 0.8.0 (or later) for PC Joystick support. flex 2.5.2 (optional for recompiling lex files).

    FURTHER REFERENCE: “README” (Text file included in the archive).

    ProDOS Emulator (version 0.1)

    AVAILABILITY: Available for free download from:

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/prodosemu/prodosemu.v0.1. tar.gz

    ftp://apple2.caltech.edu/pub/apple2/emulators/prodosemu.v0.1.tar.gz

    AUTHOR: Matthew Ghio <ghio@netcom.com> (based on Randy Frank’s 65C02 emulator and I/O code).

    STATUS: Development in progress.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: ProDOS Emulator emulates the ProDOS functions of an Apple //e, using a directory on the Unix system as a simulated drive (Slot 7, Drive 1) – thus eliminating the need for disk-images. Put the ProDOS files (such as BASIC.SYSTEM or SHRINKIT) in the same directory as the emulator; under the emulator the current directory appears as a disk named /UNIX at S7,D1. Requires compiling (C source code).

    ROMS: ProDOS Emulator does not come with the necessary Apple //e ROMs. The missing ROM is the main Apple ROM (“apple.rom”) – these ROMs can be copied from your Apple //e by following the instructions in the README file accompanying the archive.

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/apple_IIe_rom.zi p

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: N/A; uses current directory as simulated drive.

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: Unknown.

    FURTHER REFERENCE: “README” (Text file included in the archive).

    XGS (version 0.50)

    HOMEPAGE:

    http://www.jurai.org/~funaho/emulators/XGS/

    AVAILABILITY: Available for free download from:

    http://www.jurai.org/~funaho/emulators/XGS/xgs-0.50-LinuxX11.tar.gz

    http://www.jurai.org/~funaho/emulators/XGS/xgs-0.53-src.tar.gz (beta source code)

    http://www.jurai.org/~funaho/emulators/XGS/xgs-0.50-src.tar.gz (source code)

    AUTHOR: Joshua M. Thompson <funaho@jurai.org>.

    STATUS: Development in progress. Check the mailing list for further information (email <majordomo@jurai.org> with the words “subscribe xgs- list” in the body of the letter) or the development mailing list (email <majordomo@jurai.org> with the words “subscribe xgs-dev” in the body of the letter).

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: XGS emulates a ROM01 or ROM03 Apple IIGS, with the following features: CPU and memory map emulation, graphics modes up to super high resolution, ADB keyboard, clock chip, battery RAM, IWM hardware emulation for Slot 5 & 6 drives, ProDOS block device in Slot 7 and classic Apple ][ sound. Further IIGS features such as Ensoniq sound and GS/OS 6 capacity will be added in future releases.

    ROMS: XGS does not come with the necessary ROMs. The emulator requires a copy of the Apple IIGS ROM03 – these ROMs can be copied from your Apple IIGS by following the procedures in the “README” text file included with the package.

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/xgs.rom

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: 2IMG universal format, from version 0.50. From version 0.50 onwards the previous proprietary image type is no longer supported. The archive includes a utility named “imgconv” to convert disk-images from the previous type into XGS image files.

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: Linux+X11 (ELF format only).

    FURTHER REFERENCES: “README” (Text file included in the archive) and “The Official XGS FAQ (version 1.3)”.

    http://www.jurai.org/~funaho/emulators/XGS/xgsfaq13.txt

    RELATED FILES:

    Revival – a 2IMG image utility for Windows 95, by Thomas Fok <thomas@glink.net.hk> (2IMG format not compatible with XGS versions prior to 0.48)

    http://www.glink.net.hk/~thomas/revival.htm

    “Using .SHK Files on an XGS” – Two-part article on using *.SHK and *.BSC files with XGS, by Bruce E. Fleury <bfleury@mailhost.tcs.tulane.edu>.

    ftp://ground.isca.uiowa.edu/apple2/Faqs/emul.dsk

    ftp://ground.isca.uiowa.edu/apple2/Faqs/emul2.dsk

    IBM-PC – MSDOS OS

    HINT: Can?t run Wizardry or any other software which requires the disk- image being write protected? Just set the MSDOS read-only attribute (ATTRIB +r) on the disk-image…

    Applemu (Apple Emu)

    AVAILABILITY: Available for free download from:

    ftp://ftp.uni-kl.de/pub/apple2/ibmpc/applemu.zip

    AUTHOR: Unknown.

    STATUS: Development ceased.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: Applemu emulates a 48K Apple ][+, and allows disk- swapping. Disk-images are “saved” to directly on the hard-disk from within the emulator. An option to write protect the disk-image being loaded into either drive is offered. The function keys control disk-swapping routines. Unfortunately, most of the more advanced Apple software requires a 64K machine, and thus will not load on Applemu.

    ROMS: Applemu comes with the necessary Apple ][+ ROMs and is ready for use after decompression. The Apple ROMs are stored in “APPLBIOS.COM”.

    NOTE: To run Intbasic programs, get the “INTBASIC.COM” file, rename “APPLBIOS.COM” as “FPBASIC.COM”, and then rename “INTBASIC.COM” as “APPLBIOS.COM”.

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: Nibblized Dos Order (NDO – size: 232960 bytes).

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: 80286 cpu with CGA graphics (recommended) – according to the documentation, any PC with “128K memory, DOS 2.0 or greater”, although on a 4.77 MHZ 8088 it takes almost a minute to boot a disk.

    FURTHER REFERENCES: “APPLE.DOC” (Text file included in the archive).

    RELATED FILES:

    INTBASIC.COM – File containing the Integer Basic language for Apple Emu.

    ftp://wilbur.stanford.edu/pub/apple2/incoming/intbasic.com

    ApplePC (version 2.52b)

    AVAILABILITY: Available for free download from:

    ftp://users.aol.com/davidells/ApplePC/ApplePC.zip (version 2.52b)

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/applepc/ApplePC_2.52.zip Older versions as below:

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/applepc/ApplePC_2.50.zip

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/applepc/ApplePC_2.45.zip

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/applepc/ApplePC_2.42.zip

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/applepc/ApplePC_2.40.zip

    ftp://apple2.caltech.edu/pub/apple2/emulators/applepc2.40.zip

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/applepc/ApplePC_2.30.zip

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/applepc/ApplePC_2.20.zip

    ftp://ftp.gmd.de/if-archive/emulators/appleII/ApplePC_220.zip

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/applepc/ApplePC_2.13.zip

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/applepc/ApplePC_2.12.zip

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/applepc/ApplePC_2.11.zip

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/applepc/ApplePC_2.10.zip

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/applepc/ApplePC_2.06.zip

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/applepc/ApplePC_2.05.zip

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/applepc/ApplePC_2.00.zip

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/applepc/ApplePC_1.90.zip

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/applepc/ApplePC_1.81.zip

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/applepc/ApplePC_1.80.zip

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/applepc/ApplePC_1.70.zip

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/applepc/ApplePC_1.66.zip

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/applepc/ApplePC_1.65.zip

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/applepc/ApplePC_1.60.zip

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/applepc/ApplePC_1.50.zip

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/applepc/apple2c_1.00.zip

    AUTHOR: David Ellsworth <davidells@aol.com> (based on code by Randy Spurlock).

    STATUS: Unknown.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: ApplePC emulates a 128K Apple //c. From a post by the author on “comp.emulators.apple2”: “It is extremely fast, has true ‘pixel- perfect’ graphics (switchable between mono and colour), a built-in debugger, and disk-swapping.” The emulator will work with it’s own (non- standard) //c, //e files and Applewin’s //e ROM file – to provide additional software compatibility. From v2.00a it also uses Applewin’s ][+ ROM to supply an Apple ][+ mode.

    ROMS: ApplePC comes with the necessary Apple ROMs, which are supplied in separate files for the //c and //e ROMs.

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/apple_II_rom.zip

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/apple_II+_rom.zi p

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/apple_IIc_rom.zi p

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/apple_IIe_rom.zi p

    ftp://users.aol.com/davidells/ApplePC/Apple.II.plus.ROM.zip

    ftp://users.aol.com/davidells/ApplePC/Apple.IIc.ROM.zip

    ftp://users.aol.com/davidells/ApplePC/Apple.IIe.ROM.zip

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: DOS3.3 Order (DO – size: 143360 bytes); from version 2.05a the emulator also supports Nibblized Dos Order (NDO – size: 232960 bytes); from version 2.40a is also supports ProDOS Order (DO – size: 143360 bytes). It also supports virtual hard-disk volumes in //e emulation mode only.

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: 80386 CPU with VGA graphics.

    FURTHER REFERENCES: “APPLE.DOC” (Text file included in the archive). An online version of the documentation is available from:

    http://www.ecnet.net/users/mumbv/pages/applepcdoc.html

    RELATED FILES:

    A2PCText v0.2 – Command-line based program which extracts 40 and 80 column text images from ApplePC’s “save state” file.

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/applepc/ApplePC_to_txt.zi p

    sdv2hdv – A small PC utility to remove the 15 byte header from Sim2E .HDVs for use with ApplePC, by Greg Elkin <beermat@cix.compulink.co.uk>.

    ftp://ground.isca.uiowa.edu/apple2/Emulators/sdv2hdv.zip.uue

    Bootable hard-drive – Details for creating a bootable virtual hard-drive suggested by Rejean Bazinet:

     1) Use debug in DOS to create the hard-disk file by typing:
        debug harddisk.hdv
        w
        q
        and return to DOS with the harddisk.hdv file of 0 bytes.
     2) Start ApplePC and select 'D' for disk, then 'S' to change to Slot 7, then
        '1' and press TAB to select the file harddisk.hdv.
     3) Press 'Z' to set harddisk emulation to ON, and press 'S' to return to
        Slot 6.
     4) Select a ProDOS master disk-image with SYSUTIL.SYSTEM, and type
        '-sysutil.system'. Select Format a Disk, choose Slot 7 and Drive 1, and
        after the drive is formatted, copy the master ProDOS files to harddisk.hdv.
     5) Return to the ] prompt and type 'PR#7' to test the harddisk.hdv.
    

    Appler

    HOMEPAGE:

    http://www.geocities.com/SiliconValley/Bay/3577/appler.html

    AVAILABILITY: Available for free download from:

    http://www.geocities.com/SiliconValley/Bay/3577/appler.zip

    http://www.geocities.com/SiliconValley/Bay/3577/aplersrc.zip (Source Code)

    AUTHOR: Emil Dochevsky <zajo@geocities.com> & Alexander Patalensky.

    STATUS: Development in progress.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: Appler emulates a 64K Apple ][. It supports all video modes, a digital joystick (using the number-pad) and two floppy disk drives. Realtime mode can be toggled for faster machines. Other options include an inbuilt debugger, file- and disk-manager, keyboard setup feature and help screens. The RAM state of the emulator can be saved at any time to a disk file.

    ROMS: Appler comes with the necessary Apple II ROMs and is ready for use after decompression. The Apple ROMs are stored in “APPLE.ROM” and “FLOPPY.ROM”.

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: DOS3.3 Order (DO – size: 143360 bytes) and Nibblized Dos Order (NDO – size: 232960 bytes).

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: 80386 cpu with 1Mb RAM, EGA graphics, MS-DOS 3.30 (486/33MHz recommended).

    FURTHER REFERENCES: “APPLER.DOC” (Text file included in the archive).

    Apl2Em

    AVAILABILITY: Available for free download from:

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/apple_2_for_windows/apl2e m/apl2em.zip

    ftp://sunb.ocs.mq.edu.au/PC/Emulators/apl2em.zip

    ftp://ftp.uni-kl.de/pub/apple2/ibmpc/apl2em.zip

    AUTHOR: Randy Spurlock <randys@gocart.eng.hou.compaq.com>.

    STATUS: Development ceased.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: Apl2Em emulates a 64K Apple][+, but does not allow disk- swapping whilst in use. Disk-images are “saved” to directly on the hard- disk from within the emulator. This means that although Apl2Em can run all of the 64K multi-disk software that Applemu cannot, you can only pre-load two disks (D1 and D2).

    ROMS: Apl2Em comes with the necessary Apple ][+ ROMs and is ready for use after decompression. The Apple ROMs in “APPLE.ROM” and the disk-drive controller ROMs are stored in “DISK.ROM”.

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: DOS3.3 Order (DO – size: 143360 bytes).

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: 80286 cpu with CGA graphics (will not display correctly on a monochrome monitor).

    FURTHER REFERENCES: “APPLE.DOC” (Text file included in the archive).

    RELATED FILES:

    Appjoy – Modified executable for Apl2Em by Dan Wolfsond <wolfsond@cse.fau.edu>, which replaces the numeric joystick emulation with a PC analog joystick.

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/apple_2_for_windows/apl2e m/appjoy.zip

    Apl2Em-2 (Apl2Em v2)

    AVAILABILITY: Available for free download from:

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/apple_2_for_windows/apl2e m/apl2em-2.zip

    ftp://ftp.uni-kl.de/pub/apple2/ibmpc/apl2em-2.zip

    AUTHOR: Randy Spurlock <randys@gocart.eng.hou.compaq.com>.

    STATUS: See Apl2Em-3.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: Apl2Em-2 emulates a 64K Apple ][+, but does not allow disk-swapping whilst in use. Disk-images are “saved” to directly on the hard-disk from within the emulator. This means that although Apl2Em can run all of the 64K multi-disk software that Applemu cannot, you can only pre- load two disks (D1 and D2).

    NOTE: Some people have found a way to “swap” disk-image files whilst the emulator is running by using the multi-tasking abilities of Windows or OS/2. It would be a case of moving the “SYSTEM.DSK” file (or whatever the default DSK name is for D1) out of the A2EM directory and replacing it with a subsequent disk (also titled “SYSTEM.DSK”). A routine to handle disk- swapping under OS/2 is available (see below).

    ROMS: Apl2Em-2 does not come with the necessary Apple ][+ ROMs. The missing ROMs are the main Apple ROMs (“APPLE.ROM”) and disk-drive ROMs (“FLOPPY.ROM”) – these ROMs can be copied from your old Apple ][ by following the procedures in the “dumping-ROMs” text file on wilbur. You don’t really need the Serial ROMs to use Apl2Em-2 – just edit the “APPLE.INI” file at Slot 1 to read “Type=Empty”.

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/apple.rom

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: DOS3.3 Order (DO – size: 143360 bytes).

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: 80286 cpu with CGA graphics (will not display correctly on a monochrome monitor).

    FURTHER REFERENCES: “APPLE.DOC” (Text file included in the archive).

    RELATED FILES:

    Apl2em2f – A routine to handle disk-swapping for Apl2Em-2 under OS/2.

    ftp://frmap711.mathp7.jussieu.fr/pub/scratch/rideau/misc/apple2/apl2em2f.zi p

    CAPPLE v2.0 – Routines released by Scott Crow <corvus@am.ucsc.edu> which replace the keyboard joystick emulation with a PC analog joystick routine, as well as a speed delay.

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/apple_2_for_windows/apl2e m/capple-v2.zip

    Lowercase – Activate the full lowercase features of the Apple’s character ROM on the ][+ emulator, with a hex editor, APPLE.ROM and the simple instructions in this file! From Rich Williamson <glitch@eskimo.com>.

    ftp://wilbur.stanford.edu/pub/apple2/apl-lower.txt

    Apl2Em-3 (Apl2Em v3)

    AVAILABILITY: Available for free download from:

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/apple_2_for_windows/apl2e m/apl2em-3.zip

    ftp://apple2.caltech.edu/pub/apple2/emulators/apl2em3.zip

    AUTHOR: Tew Neal T. <loopy@bert.cs.byu.edu> (based on Apl2Em by Randy Spurlock).

    STATUS: Development in progress.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: Apl2Em-3 emulates a 64K Apple][+ (see Apl2Em-2 above for details). New items added are: adjustable emulator speed, disk-switching, mixed low resolution and text mode, a fix for low resolution colours, improved high resolution graphics and joystick support.

    ROMS: Apl2Em-3 comes with the necessary Apple ][+ ROMs and is ready for use after decompression. The Apple ROMs are stored in “APPLE.ROM”, the disk- drive ROMs in “FLOPPY.ROM” and the serial ROMs in “SERIAL.ROM”.

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: DOS3.3 Order (DO – size: 143360 bytes).

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: 80286 cpu with CGA graphics (will not display correctly on a monochrome monitor).

    FURTHER REFERENCES: “APPLE.DOC” (Text file included in the archive).

    Apple ][+ Emulator (version 2.0)

    AVAILABILITY: Available for free download from:

    http://www.zipcon.com/~miller/apps/apl6502.zip (v2.0) Older versions as below:

    ftp://ftp.uni-kl.de/pub/apple2/ibmpc/apl6502.zip (v1.0)

    AUTHOR: Steven E. Hugg <hugg@pobox.com>; version 2.0 by Jeff Miller <miller@zipcon.net>.

    STATUS: Development ceased.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: Apple ][+ Emulator emulates an Apple ][+; with most features except for 80 column display, mouse, printer and digital joystick support. According to the documentation for version 2.0, the emulator runs about 85% of disk-images. Includes source (PASCAL).

    ROMS: Apple ][+ Emulator version 2.0 includes the Apple ROMs as part of the executable. Version 1.0 does not include the necessary ROMs. The ROMs required are: Apple ROM (“ROM.DAT”) and the disk controller ROM (“DABOOT.DAT”).

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/apple.rom

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: DOS3.3 Order (DO – size: 143360 bytes) and proprietary nibble disk-images, created using the “cvtdos.exe” executable (included in the archive).

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: 80386 cpu with EGA graphics.

    FURTHER REFERENCES: “6502.TXT” and “6502-2.TXT” (Text files included in the archive).

    AppleUni (version 2.79.40)

    HOMEPAGE:

    http://apple.rum.org/inside.html

    http://freenet.buffalo.edu/~ag784/

    http://ftsoy.falcon.org/appleuni/AppleUni/ (Mirror)

    AVAILABILITY: Available for free download from:

    http://apple.rum.org/AppleUni/AppleUni-2.79.40.exe (upgrade executable)

    http://apple.rum.org/AppleUni/AppleUni-2.79.40.zip (base package) Older versions as below:

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/appleuni/appleuni- 2.79.30.zip

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/appleuni/appleuni- 2.79.19.pre-release.zip

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/appleuni/apluni2.73.zip

    ftp://apple2.caltech.edu/pub/apple2/emulators/apluni2.73.zip

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/appleuni/apluni24.zip

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/appleuni/apluni21.zip

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/appleuni/apluni19.zip

    ftp://ftp.uni-kl.de/pub/apple2/ibmpc/apluni19.zip

    AUTHOR: Andrew J. Kroll <ag784@freenet.buffalo.edu> <ajk@ftsoy.falcon.org> (earlier versions based on code by Randy Spurlock).

    STATUS: Development in progress.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: AppleUni emulates an Apple ][+; it supports all Apple video modes except mixed mode with four lines of text below the graphics, has a 32K language card and allows saving to disk-images. Mixed text/graphics and //e emulation with 80 column card are planned for future releases. Hard-drive emulation is supported from version 2.79.

    ROMS: Later versions of AppleUni come with the necessary Apple ][+ ROMs and are ready for use after decompression. The ROMs included (or required) are: Apple ROM (IIP.IMG), disk controller ROM (DSK.IMG) and the super serial card ROM (SER.IMG).

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: DOS3.3 Order (DO – size: 143360 bytes); from version 2.73 the emulator also supports Nibblized Dos Order (NDO – size: 232960 bytes). From version 2.79 it also support virtual hard-disk volumes.

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: 8088 cpu with CGA graphics (minimum), EGA or VGA recommended (“the only emulator that will run on an XT, and that fully emulates Apple’s Super Serial Card!” – from “APPLEUNI.DOC”). VGA minimum from version 2.79.35.

    FURTHER REFERENCES: “APPLEUNI.DOC”, “HISTORY.DOC” and “APPLUNI.FAQ” (Text files included with the archive).

    Central Point Option Board

    HOMEPAGE:

    http://www.ece.nwu.edu/~cbachman/apple.html (Information and software for the Option Board)

    AVAILABILITY: Commercial product, no longer in production.

    AUTHOR: Central Point.

    STATUS: Development ceased.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: This product is not strictly an emulator, but a hardware card which acts as an addition to the drive controller. Functionally, it allows PC drives to read GCR encoded disks (Mac 800K and Apple ][).

    ROMS: N/A.

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: N/A.

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: Unknown.

    FURTHER REFERENCES: N/A.

    RELATED FILES:

    IMG2DSK – Small executable which converts Option Board disk-images to the standard emulator format.

    http://www.ece.nwu.edu/~cbachman/img2dsk.zip

    SimIIe – SimSystem IIe (version 1.0)

    AVAILABILITY: Shareware, available for free download from:

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/simiie/sim2e.zip

    ftp://ground.isca.uiowa.edu/apple2/Emulators/IIE4PC.LZH

    ftp://ftp.uni-kl.de/pub/apple2/ibmpc/simiie.zip

    NOTE: SimIIe is Shareware for ten days; registration costs $50 (US) + $6 shipping.

    American Research Inc.

    2120 Deercreek Rd.

    Simi Valley, CA 93065.

    AUTHOR: Jim Sproul.

    STATUS: Unknown.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: SimIIe emulates a 128K Apple //e, using “clean-room” ROMs. It allows disk-swapping and saving to a disk-image – in short, is does just about everything: 80 columns, parallel printer adaptor, FOUR simulated disk-drives (5 1/4, 3 1/2 and ProDOS hard-drives), real joystick routines and more! On the negative side, this emulator is extremely slow on 33mHz computers.

    ROMS: N/A (Apple ROMs are not used in this emulator).

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: SimIIe (IIe – size: 143390 bytes).

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: 80286 cpu with CGA graphics, 80486 recommended. SimIIe will not work on 8086, 8088 or V20 microprocessors, and is not compatible with Microsoft Windows (it cannot be run as a DOS task).

    FURTHER REFERENCES: “SIMIIE.DOC” (Text file included in the archive).

    RELATED FILES:

    PATSIM2E – A patched version of the SimIIe executable, for computers which hang after pressing “R” in the configuration screen, giving a black screen.

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/simiie/patsim2e.zip

    SIM2DU10 – Utilities for SimIIe released by Galen C. Hunt <gchunt@cc.dixie.edu>. These include .IIE and .HDV creation programs and a single file transfer utility. Source code included.

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/simiie/sim2du10.zip

    SIMIIE_F – A simple patch to fix hanging at the directory/file select box, by <mpohores@sfu.ca>.

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/simiie/simiie_f.doc

    32MB_HD – A 32Mb virtual hard-disk (.HDV) for SimIIe, containing Apple ProDOS 2.0.3, BASIC.SYSTEM 1.5 and ShrinkIt 3.4, by <beermat@cix.compulink.co.uk>.

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/simiie/32mb_hd.zip

    TrackStar/TrackStar Plus

    AVAILABILITY: Commercial product, no longer in production.

    AUTHOR: Diamond Computer Systems, Inc.

    470 Lakeside Drive

    Sunnyvale, California 94086.

    (408)736-2000 Telephone

    (408)730-5750 FAX

    STATUS: Development ceased.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: The TrackStar Plus is an 8-bit ISA card for the PC AT, emulating a a 128K //e. Standard features include a 65C02 microprocessor, with 128K main memory, 40 and 80 column text, and LoRes, HiRes and Double HiRes graphic modes. Four disk-drives and a hard-drive are supported, along with local area networks, and standard serial and parallel ports. The TrackStar can access up to 10Mb of the PC hard-drive, allows the attachment of an Apple floppy drive for complete compatibility with protected software, and has joystick support.

    ROMS: N/A.

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: “TrackStore” (40/80 track images capable of duplicating protected software, file extension *.APP) and virtual hard-disk support (10Mb of the PC hard-drive). The card actually runs original software on 5.25″ diskette, although it can be used to create disk-images for use with other emulators.

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: 80286 CPU with CGA graphics.

    FURTHER REFERENCES: N/A.

    (The preceding information on the TrackStar was obtained from information sent by Tony Ramos <ramos.15@osu.edu>).

    ][ in a PC

    AVAILABILITY: Commercial product, no longer in production.

    AUTHOR: COMPUTER:applications

    12813 Lindeley Drive

    Raleigh, NC 27614.

    STATUS: Development ceased.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: ][ in a PC is a package which emulates an unenhanced Apple //e, including all necessary utility programs for transferring Apple II software bidirectionally between an Apple II and IBM compatible computer. The emulator supports 128K memory, serial and parallel outputs, two 5.25″ drives, two 3.5″ drives, ProDOS hard-disk, 40/80 column text, full colour HiRes/LoRes graphics, joystick support, and Applesoft compatible BASIC.

    ROMS: N/A.

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: N/A.

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: 80286 CPU with CGA graphics/Apple ][+ or greater with serial card.

    FURTHER REFERENCES: N/A.

    (The preceding information on ][ in a PC was obtained from a review compiled by Arthur A. Luna <netcoking@aol.com>).

    XGS-DOS (version 0.50r4)

    HOMEPAGE:

    http://classicgaming.com/xgsdos/

    AVAILABILITY: Available for free download from:

    http://classicgaming.com/xgsdos/Download/xd0504.zip

    http://classicgaming.com/xgsdos/Download/xd0504.rar

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/xgs/xgs050_Win32.zip

    AUTHOR: Joshua M. Thompson <funaho@jurai.org>; DOS version ported and maintained by Gilles Tschopp <gilles.tschopp@icare.ch>.

    STATUS: Development in progress. Check the mailing list for further information (email <majordomo@jurai.org> with the words “subscribe xgs- list” in the body of the letter) or the development mailing list (email <majordomo@jurai.org> with the words “subscribe xgs-dev” in the body of the letter).

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: XGS emulates a ROM01 or ROM03 Apple IIGS, with the following features: CPU and memory map emulation, graphics modes up to super high resolution, ADB keyboard, clock chip, battery RAM, IWM hardware emulation for Slot 5 & 6 drives, ProDOS block device in Slot 7 and classic Apple ][ sound. Further IIGS features such as GS/OS 6 capacity will be added in future releases.

    ROMS: XGS does not come with the necessary ROMs. The emulator requires a copy of the Apple IIGS ROM03 – these ROMs can be copied from your Apple IIGS by following the procedures in the “README” text file included with the package.

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/xgs.rom

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: 2IMG universal format, from version 0.50. From version 0.50 onwards the previous proprietary image type is no longer supported. The archive includes a utility named “imgconv” to convert disk-images from the previous type into XGS image files.

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: 90 MHz Pentium or better, running DOS 5.0, Win95 or OS/2 Warp 3.0 or higher, with 8Mb RAM (for DOS) or 16Mb (Win95/Warp). XGS- DOS will NOT work with 486 systems.

    FURTHER REFERENCES: “README” (Text file included in the archive) and “The Official XGS FAQ (version 1.3)”.

    http://www.jurai.org/~funaho/emulators/XGS/xgsfaq13.txt

    RELATED FILES:

    An image file for testing XGS-DOS.

    http://classicgaming.com/xgsdos/Download/imgtest.zip

    http://classicgaming.com/xgsdos/Download/imgtest.rar

    Image Utilities for XGS-DOS v0.48, written by Matthew Conte <itsbroke@ix.netcom.com>.

    http://classicgaming.com/xgsdos/Download/imgutil.zip (DOS)

    http://classicgaming.com/xgsdos/Download/imgutil.rar (DOS)

    http://classicgaming.com/xgsdos/Download/imgutos2.zip (OS/2 Warp)

    http://classicgaming.com/xgsdos/Download/imgutos2.rar (OS/2 Warp)

    Revival – a 2IMG image utility for Windows 95, by Thomas Fok <thomas@glink.net.hk> (2IMG format not compatible with XGS versions prior to 0.48)

    http://www.glink.net.hk/~thomas/revival.htm

    “Using .SHK Files on an XGS” – Two-part article on using *.SHK and *.BSC files with XGS, by Bruce E. Fleury <bfleury@mailhost.tcs.tulane.edu>.

    ftp://ground.isca.uiowa.edu/apple2/Faqs/emul.dsk

    ftp://ground.isca.uiowa.edu/apple2/Faqs/emul2.dsk

    XCHANGE 1.0B2

    http://classicgaming.com/xgsdos/Download/xchange.zip

    http://classicgaming.com/xgsdos/Download/XCHANGE.RAR

    XGS (version 0.50)

    HOMEPAGE:

    http://www.jurai.org/~funaho/emulators/XGS/

    AVAILABILITY: Available for free download from:

    http://www.jurai.org/~funaho/emulators/XGS/xgs050.zip

    http://www.jurai.org/~funaho/emulators/XGS/xgs-0.53-src.tar.gz (beta source code)

    http://www.jurai.org/~funaho/emulators/XGS/xgs-0.50-src.tar.gz (source code)

    AUTHOR: Joshua M. Thompson <funaho@jurai.org>.

    STATUS: Development in progress. Check the mailing list for further information (email <majordomo@jurai.org> with the words “subscribe xgs- list” in the body of the letter) or the development mailing list (email <majordomo@jurai.org> with the words “subscribe xgs-dev” in the body of the letter).

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: XGS emulates a ROM01 or ROM03 Apple IIGS, with the following features: CPU and memory map emulation, graphics modes up to super high resolution, ADB keyboard, clock chip, battery RAM, IWM hardware emulation for Slot 5 & 6 drives, ProDOS block device in Slot 7 and classic Apple ][ sound. Further IIGS features such as Ensoniq sound and GS/OS 6 capacity will be added in future releases.

    ROMS: XGS does not come with the necessary ROMs. The emulator requires a copy of the Apple IIGS ROM03 – these ROMs can be copied from your Apple IIGS by following the procedures in the “README” text file included with the package.

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/xgs.rom

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: 2IMG universal format, from version 0.50. From version 0.50 onwards the previous proprietary image type is no longer supported. The archive includes a utility named “imgconv” to convert disk-images from the previous type into XGS image files.

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: 90 MHz Pentium or better, running Win32 with DirectX.

    FURTHER REFERENCES: “README” (Text file included in the archive) and “The Official XGS FAQ (version 1.3)”.

    http://www.jurai.org/~funaho/emulators/XGS/xgsfaq13.txt

    RELATED FILES:

    Image Utilities for XGS-DOS v0.48, written by Matthew Conte <itsbroke@ix.netcom.com>.

    http://classicgaming.com/xgsdos/Download/imgutil.zip (DOS)

    http://classicgaming.com/xgsdos/Download/imgutil.rar (DOS)

    http://classicgaming.com/xgsdos/Download/imgutos2.zip (OS/2 Warp)

    http://classicgaming.com/xgsdos/Download/imgutos2.rar (OS/2 Warp)

    Revival – a 2IMG image utility for Windows 95, by Thomas Fok <thomas@glink.net.hk> (2IMG format not compatible with XGS versions prior to 0.48)

    http://www.glink.net.hk/~thomas/revival.htm

    “Using .SHK Files on an XGS” – Two-part article on using *.SHK and *.BSC files with XGS, by Bruce E. Fleury <bfleury@mailhost.tcs.tulane.edu>.

    ftp://ground.isca.uiowa.edu/apple2/Faqs/emul.dsk

    ftp://ground.isca.uiowa.edu/apple2/Faqs/emul2.dsk

    XCHANGE 1.0B2

    http://classicgaming.com/xgsdos/Download/xchange.zip

    http://classicgaming.com/xgsdos/Download/XCHANGE.RAR

    IBM-PC – Windows OS

    HINT: Can?t run Wizardry or any other software which requires the disk- image being write protected? Just set the MSDOS read-only attribute (ATTRIB +r) on the disk-image…

    Apple II Oasis for Windows (version 2.0)

    HOMEPAGE:

    http://www.geocities.com/SiliconValley/Lakes/4414

    AVAILABILITY: Shareware, available for free download from:

    http://www.geocities.com/SiliconValley/Lakes/4414/apl24win.zip

    ftp://ftp.tu-varna.acad.bg/private/TA/apl24win.zip Older versions as below:

    ftp://ground.isca.uiowa.edu/apple2/Emulators/APL24WIN.ZIP (v1.45)

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/apple_2_for_windows/apple _II_for_win_14.zip (v1.40)

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/apple_2_for_windows/apl24 win.zip (v1.30)

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/apple_2_for_windows/apl24 wn.zip (v1.30)

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/apple_2_for_windows/apl2e m4w.ima.gz (WinImage/DCF file) (v1.20)

    NOTE: Apple II Oasis for Windows is Shareware; registration costs $25 (US).

    AUTHOR: Teodor Angeloff <apl24win@usa.net> or <ta@ms3.tu-varna.acad.bg>.

    STATUS: Development in progress.

    SCREENSHOTS:

    http://www.geocities.com/SiliconValley/Lakes/4414/SCRNSHOT.HTM

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: Apple II Oasis for Windows emulates a 128K+ Apple //e, with 65C02 and Z80 microprocessors, an 80-column card, all video modes, Disk II drives and fixed disks, real-time clock, joystick and Apple II mouse, amongst other things. From version 1.45 onwards, the package also includes two Apple II disk utilities – the Apple II Disk Manager and the Apple II Disk Server.

    ROMS: Apple II Oasis for Windows comes with the necessary Apple //e ROMs.

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: A4W (A4W – size: 143388 bytes).

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: 80386 or better running Windows 3.1.

    FURTHER REFERENCES: Unknown.

    RELATED FILES:

    Apple II Disk Manager – An application which performs directory list, copy, move, delete, etc. operations on Apple DOS 3.3 and ProDOS formatted disk- images. This application is included in the emulator archive.

    Apple II Disk Server – A remote ProDOS hard-disk in a disk-image file. Included in the emulator archive.

    (Thanks to the author for sending a copy of his emulator. – Alex)

    AppleWin (version 1.4)

    AVAILABILITY: Available for free download from:

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/applewin/AppleWin_1.40.zi p (upgrade executable)

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/applewin/AppleWin_1.10.zi p (base package)

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/applewin/AppleWin_1.10_sr c.zip (source) Older versions as below:

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/applewin/AppleWin_1.30.zi p (upgrade executable)

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/applewin/AppleWin_1.20.zi p (upgrade executable)

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/applewin/AppleWin_1.12.zi p (upgrade executable)

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/applewin/AppleWin_95.zip

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/applewin/AppleWin_1.00.zi p

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/applewin/AppleWin_1.00_sr c.zip

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/applewin/AppleWin_beta2.z ip

    ftp://apple2.caltech.edu/pub/apple2/emulators/aplwinb2.zip

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/applewin/AppleWin_beta1.z ip

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/applewin/AppleWin_alpha.z ip

    AUTHOR: Michael O’Brien <mobrien@netcom.com>; upgrade executables by Terry Hsu <TERA.bbs@bbs.ee.nthu.edu.tw>.

    STATUS: Source code released for public modification.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: AppleWin is a 32-bit Windows program which emulates a “Platinum” model enhanced Apple //e with 128k RAM. It supports all video modes, including double high-res and mixed mode. It plays sound through a sound card (preferred) or the PC speaker. It supports emulating an Apple joystick using the PC keyboard, joystick, or mouse. It allows saving to disk images and on-the-fly swapping of disk images.

    There are two versions of AppleWin, both included in the ZIP file:

    applew31.exe – Use this version if you are running Windows 3.1 or Windows for Workgroups. You must also install the Win32s 32-bit extensions, which are available from the same FTP site.

    applewin.exe – Use this version if you are running Windows 95 or Windows NT.

    It is recommended that you switch your video card to 256-color mode for best performance when running AppleWin. If you are having trouble using AppleWin with your video driver, or trouble formatting disks under AppleWin, obtain and install “patch2.zip” which is available from the same FTP site.

    If you do not have a joystick driver for Windows, you can obtain “ibmjoy.zip” from the FTP site. Remember to calibrate your joystick using the Windows Control Panel before using it in AppleWin.

    By default, AppleWin controls its emulation speed so that it runs exactly as fast as a real Apple //e. If you would like for it to run as fast as possible on your system, click on the Configuration button (on the bottom) and turn off the “control system speed” option.

    Versions 1.00 and 1.10 are faster and includes speed control, modem support, and monochrome monitor emulation. Version 1.00 requires Windows 95 or NT (not Win32s). And both now come with source code!

    ROMS: AppleWin comes with the necessary Apple ][+ and //e ROMs, stored in “APPLE2.ROM” and “APPLE2E.ROM”.

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: DOS3.3, ProDOS and nibblized orders (auto-detecting).

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: 80486 or better running Windows 95, Windows NT 3.5, or Windows 3.1 (Windows 3.1 requires Win32s).

    FURTHER REFERENCES: “README.TXT” (Text file included in the archive). Online help available from within AppleWin.

    (Thanks to the author for the description of the emulator appearing above. – Alex)

    RELATED FILES:

    IBMJOY – Joystick driver which replaces the emulated number-pad joystick.

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/applewin/Win_IBM_joystick .zip

    Replacement patches for Applewin – fixes some video driver/disk formatting problems.

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/applewin/Win32s_OS2_fix.z ip

    AppleWin speed patch – Undocumented method of speeding up AppleWin, suggested by Bruno Zeitoun <100125.2116@compuserve.com>:

     1) Launch Regedit.exe (under Win95)
     2) Open HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE/Software/AppleWin/CurrentVersion/Calibation/CycleGranularity
     3) Modify the value: the higher the value, the faster AppleWin runs...
    

    Birder’s Basic

    HOMEPAGE:

    http://jaybird.simplenet.com/basic.html

    AVAILABILITY: Under development.

    AUTHOR: South Street Software <jaybird_admin@hotmail.com>.

    STATUS: Development in progress.

    SCREENSHOTS:

    http://jaybird.simplenet.com/images/basic-screen1.gif

    http://jaybird.simplenet.com/images/basic-screen2.gif

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: From the homepage: Birder’s Basic “is an attempt to write an Applesoft emulator under Windows 95 that can run Apple ][+ Applesoft programs…what makes this different than current Apple ][ emulators is that file i/o will be done through Windows 95. All files will be stored on your PC accessible to any other application.”

    ROMS: N/A.

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: N/A.

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: Unknown.

    FURTHER REFERENCES: Unknown.

    Manzana (version 1.0)

    HOMEPAGE:

    http://ns.rockbridge.net/personal/talon/Projects.HTM

    AVAILABILITY: Under development.

    AUTHOR: Matthew Collins <talon@rockbridge.net>.

    STATUS: Development in progress.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: Manzana emulates an Apple //e for Windows 95/NT. From the homepage: “This program is based on GNU source for binary emulation. Unlike the other current freeware/shareware apple emulators, this has many special features. The first feature is the fact that emulated Apple programs will be able to print on the IBM-PC. To do this, it uses the default Windows print driver, and translates the Apple programs’ ImageWriter codes. The other main feature is that Manzana will be able to read Apple //e disks. It will still however support the standard “DSK” format. This program is still in a primordial state. Therefore it will take a while before a copy is posted.”

    ROMS: Unknown.

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: Unknown.

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: Unknown.

    FURTHER REFERENCES: Unknown.

    Java

    Applelet

    HOMEPAGE:

    http://pobox.com/~hugg/Applelet.html

    AVAILABILITY: N/A – the emulator runs off the homepage as a Java applet.

    AUTHOR: Steven Hugg <hugg@pobox.com>.

    STATUS: Development in progress.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: Applelet emulates an Apple ][+ with a 16K RAM card and two disk-drives. According to the website: “each slot (except for the language card) is a Java object, so expansion will be easy…you’ll even be able to plug in stuff while the emulator is running, something you can hardly do with a real Apple!”

    ROMS: N/A.

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: N/A.

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: The applet requires a Pentium-166 with Microsoft’s Internet Explorer.

    FURTHER REFERENCES: None.

    Psion

    PsiApple (version 0.1)

    HOMEPAGE:

    http://www.geocities.com/ResearchTriangle/Lab/8089/psiapple.html

    AVAILABILITY: Available for free download from:

    http://www.geocities.com/ResearchTriangle/Lab/8089/psiapple.zip

    AUTHOR: Steven Hugg <hugg@pobox.com>.

    STATUS: Development in progress.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: PsiApple emulates an Apple ][+ with 64K RAM and two disk-drives. According to the website: “the raw CPU benchmark is about 0.92 MHz on the Series 5, but the average speed is typically 0.4-0.8 MHz”.

    ROMS: PsiApple comes with the necessary Apple ][+ ROM, stored in “APPLE2.ROM”.

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: DOS3.3 Order (DO – size: 143360 bytes).

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: Psion Series 5 PDA.

    FURTHER REFERENCES: None.

    2.13 Emulator Source Code

    6502 Emulation Package (March 28 1997)

    HOMEPAGE:

    http://www.komkon.org/fms/CPUs/

    AVAILABILITY: Available for free download from:

    http://www.komkon.org/fms/CPUs/M6502-032897.tar.Z

    http://www.komkon.org/fms/CPUs/M6502-032897.zip

    AUTHOR: Marat Fayzullin <fms@cs.umd.edu>.

    STATUS: N/A.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: This package contains the source for the emulation core of the 6502 CPU. Although not an actual emulator, the 6502 CPU was used in the 8-bit Apple ][ series. See

    http://www.komkon.org/fms/CPUs/ for terms of use, as well as other emulator resources such as how to write an emulator.

    ROMS: N/A

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: N/A.

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: N/A.

    FURTHER REFERENCES: N/A.

    Apple2

    AVAILABILITY: Available for free download from:

    ftp://ftp.uni-kl.de/pub/apple2/emulators/apple2.tar.Z

    ftp://apple2.caltech.edu/pub/apple2/emulators/a2shar.Z

    AUTHOR: Peter Koch <pkoch@kiss.de>.

    STATUS: Development in progress. Contact Peter Koch <pkoch@kiss.de> for more information.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: Apple2 emulates an Apple ][ or ][+ with 64k. Supports disk swapping. Any disk, which is copyable with COPYA or FILER can be used as disk image. Supports 40 column text, 80 column text (videx emulation), lores, hires and mixed modes. Requires compiling (C source code).

    ROMS: Apple2 does not come with the necessary ROMs.

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/apple.rom

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: DOS3.3 Order (DO – size: 143360 bytes).

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: Unix/X Windows.

    FURTHER REFERENCES: There is some documentation in the tar-archive.

    RELATED FILES:

    Emulating – Discussion by Peter Koch on how he built his emulator.

    ftp://wilbur.stanford.edu/pub/apple2/emulating.txt

    (Thanks to the author for the description of the emulator appearing above. – Alex)

    Apple2e

    AVAILABILITY: Available for free download from:

    ftp://ftp.uni-kl.de/pub/apple2/emulators/ap2e.tar.Z (curses code)

    ftp://ftp.uni-kl.de/pub/apple2/emulators/ap2egl.tar.Z (GL code)

    ftp://ftp.uni-kl.de/pub/apple2/emulators/emu.disks.tar.Z (Disks)

    AUTHOR: Randy Frank <randy@tessa.iaf.uiowa.edu>.

    STATUS: Unknown.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: Apple2e emulates a 128K Apple //e, with an 80 column card in slot 3 and a combination of cards in slots 5, 6 and 7. Requires compiling (C source code).

    ROMS: Apple2e requires ROMs copied from an Enhanced //e ONLY! and a copy of the PRODOS file from a bootable ProDOS disk. These should be binary files named “CDROM” and “PRODOS” respectively.

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: DOS3.3 Order (DO – size: 143360 bytes). The “aii.docs” text file contains a short program for creating disk-images on the Apple for use with the emulator.

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: Unix.

    FURTHER REFERENCES: “aii.docs” (Text file included in the archive), and the “emua2e.docs” text file.

    ftp://ftp.uni-kl.de/pub/apple2/emulators/emua2e.docs

    Apple2Emul

    HOMEPAGE:

    http://www.pbm.com/skrenta/a2/

    AVAILABILITY: Available for free download from:

    http://www.pbm.com/skrenta/a2/a2.tar.gz

    ftp://ftp.uni-kl.de/pub/apple2/emulators/Apple2Emul.tar.Z

    STATUS: Unknown.

    AUTHOR: Rich Skrenta <skrenta@pbm.com> and Tom Markson.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: Apple2Emul is an emulator for Unix. Requires compiling (C source code).

    ROMS: Unknown.

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: DOS3.3 order (DO – size: 143360 bytes).

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: Unix.

    FURTHER REFERENCES: “Apple2Emul.readme” and “a2.readme” (Text files included in the archive).

    a2

    AVAILABILITY: Available for free download from:

    ftp://ftp.uni-kl.de/pub/apple2/emulators/a2.tar.Z

    AUTHOR: Rich Skrenta <skrenta@pbm.com>; additions by Mat Hostetter <mjhostet@athena.mit.edu>.

    STATUS: Unknown.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: a2 is an adaptation of Rich Skrenta’s emulator code, for NeXT step. Fast hi-res graphics support added by Mat Hostetter using WozView. Requires compiling (C source code).

    ROMS: a2 does not include the necessary ROMs. The “SNARF” document contains instructions on how to get a copy of the Apple ROMs.

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/apple.rom

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: Unknown (size: 215040 bytes).

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: NeXT.

    FURTHER REFERENCES: “README” and “NOTES” (Text files included in the archive).

    KEGS (Kent’s Emulated GS) (version 0.35)

    HOMEPAGE:

    http://www.mtnweb.com/~kentd/

    AVAILABILITY: Available for free download from:

    http://www.mtnweb.com/~kentd/kegs.0.35.tar.gz Older versions as below:

    http://www.mtnweb.com/~kentd/kegs.0.32b.tar.gz

    http://www.mtnweb.com/~kentd/kegs.0.31.tar.gz

    http://www.mtnweb.com/~kentd/kegs.0.30.tar.gz

    ftp://ground.isca.uiowa.edu/apple2/Emulators/kegs.0.30.tar.gz

    AUTHOR: Kent Dickey <kentd@mtnweb.com>.

    STATUS: Development in progress.

    SCREENSHOTS:

    http://www.mtnweb.com/~kentd/screenshots.html

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: KEGS emulates a 4MB Apple //gs. Excerpted from the “README.kegs” text file: “Fast 65816 emulation (about 6MHz on a 712/80, and 15MHz on a C180). Emulates low-level 5.25″ and 3.5” drive accesses (even nibble-copiers work!). Emulates classic Apple II sound and 32-voice Ensoniq sound. All sound is played in 16-bit stereo at 48KHz. Emulates all Apple //gs graphics modes, including border effects. Can handle mixed-displays (superhires at the top, lores at the bottom). Mouse and joystick support (although the joystick is hard to use). Emulates all Apple //gs memory “tricks” for full compatibility. Low-level ADB keyboard and mouse emulation enables Wolfenstein 3D to run. Clock chip emulation makes the Unix time available to the Apple //gs. Emulated battery RAM remembers control panel settings…KEGS is so accurate, even the built-in ROM selftests pass (you must be in 2.5MHz speed mode to pass the self-tests)…KEGS boots s7d1 by default. You can change this using the emulated control panel, just like a real Apple //gs. KEGS emulates a //gs with two 5.25″ drives in slot 6, two 3.5″ drives in slot 5, and up to 32 “hard drives” in slot 7.” The archive contains an executable as well as C source code.

    ROMS: KEGS does not include the necessary ROM; it needs to be provided in the form of a file called “ROM” in the KEGS directory. It can be either from a ROM 01 (131072 bytes) or from a ROM 03 machine (262144 bytes).

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/appleIIgs_rom01. zip

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/GSRom01.zip

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/gsrom03.zip

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: “Raw” format of any size, with no header or compression, including standard DOS3.3 Order (DO – size: 143360 bytes). A file named “disk_conf” in the KEGS directory tells the emulator the virtual location of the disk-image.

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: HP series 9000/700 workstations. Will not compile on other platforms (Macintosh/PC) or even other Unix versions since the 65816 interpreter is written in PA-RISC assembly code. The C-only version is portable to other machines.

    FURTHER REFERENCES: “README.kegs” (Text file included with the archive).

    RELATED FILES:

    to_pro – Utility which “formats” disk images, and moves files from Unix into the simulator. It is included in the KEGS archive.

    m65816 (version 1.1)

    HOMEPAGE:

    http://www.jurai.org/~funaho/emulators/XGS/

    AVAILABILITY: Available for free download from:

    http://www.jurai.org/~funaho/emulators/m65816-1.1.tar.gz

    AUTHOR: Joshua M. Thompson <funaho@jurai.org>.

    STATUS: Development in progress.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: m65816 is a portable 65816 CPU emulator developed as part of the XGS project. Requires compiling (C source code).

    ROMS: N/A.

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: N/A.

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: N/A.

    FURTHER REFERENCES: “README” (Text file included with the archive).

    ][+ Simulator

    AVAILABILITY: Available for free download from:

    ftp://ftp.uni-kl.de/pub/apple2/emulators/II+simulator.tar.Z

    AUTHOR: Ben Koning <ben@apple.com>.

    STATUS: Unknown (date on readme file: 1989).

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: ][+ Simulator emulates a Apple ][+. Requires compiling (C source code).

    ROMS: ][+ Simulator does not include the necessary ROMs; they need to be provided in the form of four binary files titled “APPLESOFT.ROM, “AUTOSTART.ROM”, “INTEGER.ROM” and “MONITOR.ROM”.

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/apple.rom

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: Unix binaries.

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: Unix machine.

    FURTHER REFERENCES: “README” and “README2” (Text files included with the archive).

    XApple2+ (version 1.0)

    AVAILABILITY: Available for free download from:

    ftp://ftp.uni-kl.de/pub/apple2/emulators/emulator.tar.Z

    AUTHOR: Philip J. Stephens <philip@labtam.oz.au>.

    STATUS: Unknown.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: Xapple2+ emulates an Apple ][. The emulator supports disk-image swapping and joystick emulation. Requires compiling (C source code).

    ROMS: XApple2+ does not include the necessary Apple and disk-controller ROMs.

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/apple.rom

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: Non-standard. Includes a utility named “convertdisk” to convert disk-images from .dsk and .bin (MacBinary) format to low-level nibblised format.

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: Medium-performance Sun SparcStation IPX or Sun SparcServer 1000, using a X terminal with 100,000+ XStones of performance.

    FURTHER REFERENCES: “README” (Text file included in the archive).

    XGS (version 0.50)

    HOMEPAGE:

    http://www.jurai.org/~funaho/emulators/XGS/

    AVAILABILITY: Available for free download from:

    http://www.jurai.org/~funaho/emulators/XGS/xgs0.5.hpux9.05.tar.gz (HPUX 9.02 binary version)

    http://www.jurai.org/~funaho/emulators/XGS/xgs-0.53-src.tar.gz (beta source code)

    http://www.jurai.org/~funaho/emulators/XGS/xgs-0.50-src.tar.gz (source code)

    AUTHOR: Joshua M. Thompson <funaho@jurai.org>; HPUX version compiled by Gordon Aplin <gordon@cdc.hp.com>.

    STATUS: Development in progress. Check the mailing list for further information (email <majordomo@jurai.org> with the words “subscribe xgs- list” in the body of the letter) or the development mailing list (email <majordomo@jurai.org> with the words “subscribe xgs-dev” in the body of the letter).

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: XGS emulates a ROM01 or ROM03 Apple IIGS, with the following features: CPU and memory map emulation, graphics modes up to super high resolution, ADB keyboard, clock chip, battery RAM, IWM hardware emulation for Slot 5 & 6 drives, ProDOS block device in Slot 7 and classic Apple ][ sound. Further IIGS features such as Ensoniq sound and GS/OS 6 capacity will be added in future releases.

    ROMS: XGS does not come with the necessary ROMs. The emulator requires a copy of the Apple IIGS ROM03 – these ROMs can be copied from your Apple IIGS by following the procedures in the “README” text file included with the package.

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/xgs.rom

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: 2IMG universal format, from version 0.50. From version 0.50 onwards the previous proprietary image type is no longer supported. The archive includes a utility named “imgconv” to convert disk-images from the previous type into XGS image files.

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: 90 MHz Pentium or better, running some sort of Unix operating system, an X server running in 16- or 24-bit color at a resolution of at least 800 x 600 pixels (8-bit support will be available from version 0.20), Unix Sound System (USS) and a USS-supported sound card.

    FURTHER REFERENCES: “README” (Text file included in the archive) and “The Official XGS FAQ (version 1.3)”.

    http://www.jurai.org/~funaho/emulators/XGS/xgsfaq13.txt

    RELATED FILES:

    Revival – a 2IMG image utility for Windows 95, by Thomas Fok <thomas@glink.net.hk> (2IMG format not compatible with XGS versions prior to 0.48)

    http://www.glink.net.hk/~thomas/revival.htm

    “Using .SHK Files on an XGS” – Two-part article on using *.SHK and *.BSC files with XGS, by Bruce E. Fleury <bfleury@mailhost.tcs.tulane.edu>.

    ftp://ground.isca.uiowa.edu/apple2/Faqs/emul.dsk

    ftp://ground.isca.uiowa.edu/apple2/Faqs/emul2.dsk

    YAE (Yet Another Apple ][ Emulator) (version 0.5)

    HOMEPAGE:

    http://quark.netfront.net:6502/

    AVAILABILITY: Available for free download from:

    ftp://quark.netfront.net/pub/YAE/yae.tar.gz For older versions see 2.14 Old versions of YAE below.

    AUTHOR: Doug Kwan <ctkwan@cs.hku.hk>.

    STATUS: Beta testing.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: YAE emulates an Apple //e. This is the source code of the basic emulator without the compiler. Because of the work in IIe emulation, the dynamic compiler in this version is disabled. From the author’s website: “I have re-written the video emulation of YAE to make use of the MIT-SHM shared memory extention of X11 to produce better graphics. The new video driver is optimized for a typical 32 bit workstation with an 8-bit pseudo colour display. Therefore the new version is *NOT* portable but the above set-up (32-bit CPU, 8-bit display and MIT-SHM) is quite common in the UNIX community and I will also write a generic but slower version later.” Requires compiling.

    ROMS: Not included.

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/apple.rom

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: DOS3.3 Order (DO – size: 143360 bytes).

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: “Typical” Unix 32-bit workstation (32-bit CPU, 8-bit display and MIT-SHM).

    FURTHER REFERENCES: Unknown.

    zaniWok

    AVAILABILITY: Available for free download from:

    ftp://ftp.uni-kl.de/pub/apple2/emulators/zaniWok.tar.Z

    http://www.grin.net/~cturley/gsezine/GS.WorldView/*A2.RARE.EMULATORS/A2.EMU LATOR.EXAMPLES/zaniWok/

    AUTHOR: Mat Hostetter <mjhostet@athena.mit.edu>.

    STATUS: Unknown.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: zaniWok emulates a 128K Apple //e, with 40/80 columns, all graphics modes, and a lot more. Requires compiling (C source code).

    ROMS: zaniWok does not include the necessary ROMs.

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/apple.rom

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: DOS3.3 Order (DO – size: 143360 bytes), ProDOS Order (PO), and raw disk-images.

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: NeXT.

    FURTHER REFERENCES: None.

    Old versions of YAE (Yet Another Apple ][ Emulator)

    Excerpted from a message from Doug Kwan (thanks for the e-mail! – Alex):

    "The name of the emulator is now YAE (Yet another Apple ][ Emulator) though the virtual machine for the XXX platform is still called apple2.XXX. Sources of the basic emulator (w/o the compiler), is now available. The file 'yae.tar.gz' is a compressed tar file containing the source codes."
    
    > From a post by Doug Kwan on "comp.emulators.apple2" (6 Aug 1994):
    
    >**************************************************************************
    > YAE is an Apple ][ emulator written especially for RISC based workstations
    >running Unix with X. The Sun and SGI versions of YAE have 
    >run-time code generators tranlating on-the-fly 6502 machine code
    >into SPARC or MIPS RISC machine code respectively. The software is currently
    >under development and needs testers. The simple document README.apple2.sparc
    >is available through my WWW home page. (See below)
    >**************************************************************************
    >
    >I have just ported the run-time code generator to the MIPS architecture.
    >As usual, I would like voluteers to try the new version of YAE for SGI 
    >workstations and give me feed back. The new SGI version has been tested
    >on an Indigo XS 24, an Indigo XZ 4000 and a Crimson, all running IRIX
    >4.0.5. I would appreciate if someone test this on an Indy, a Indigo2
    >an Onyx or any other SGI machines other than the ones I tried.
    >The compressed binary is available through my home page
    >
    >       URL 
    
    http://quark.netfront.net:6502/
    >
    >The non-graphics performance of YAE SGI is satisfactory. On an Indigo XZ 4000,
    >(R4000) the effective clock speed is ~ 2.5Mhz whereas that on an Indigo XS 24
    >(R3000) is ~ 1.5Mhz. Graphics of YAE still needs improvement. Action games is
    >playable on most SGI's but the speed is slower than a real Apple for very
    >graphics extensive games. For games with medium graphics workload like 
    >Lode-runner or One-on-One. The emulator run at 90% to above 100% of a
    >real Apple on an Indigo XZ 4000. YAE SGI also support 16KHz sampling sound
    >emulation on most SGI's I've tested.
    >
    >Since last week, I have been asked by people where to get the necessary ROM
    >images and whether I could give them away. If you are not a regular reader of
    >comp.emulators.apple2, get and read the FAQ list of comp.emulators.apple2.
    >The FAQ list contains all you need to know about ROM images.
    >
    >Cheers
    >
    >-Doug
    

    Yet Another Apple ][ Emulator – DEC

    HOMEPAGE:

    http://quark.netfront.net:6502/

    AVAILABILITY: Available for free download from:

    ftp://ftp.uni-kl.de/pub/apple2/emulators/d_kwan/apple2.dec.Z

    ftp://quark.netfront.net/pub/YAE/old/apple2.dec.gz

    ftp://quark.netfront.net/pub/YAE/old/yae.tar.gz (source)

    ftp://quark.netfront.net/pub/YAE/old/yae_wip.tar.gz (source & compiler)

    AUTHOR: Doug Kwan <ctkwan@cs.hku.hk>.

    STATUS: Under development.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: DEC version of the emulator.

    ROMS: Not included.

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/apple.rom

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: DOS3.3 Order (DO – size: 143360 bytes).

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: DEC.

    FURTHER REFERENCES: The “README.apple2.sparc” document describes non-Sun versions.

    http://quark.netfront.net:6502/README.html

    Yet Another Apple ][ Emulator – IBM

    HOMEPAGE:

    http://quark.netfront.net:6502/

    AVAILABILITY: Available for free download from:

    ftp://ftp.uni-kl.de/pub/apple2/emulators/d_kwan/apple2.ibm.Z

    ftp://quark.netfront.net/pub/YAE/old/apple2.ibm.gz

    ftp://quark.netfront.net/pub/YAE/old/yae.tar.gz (source)

    ftp://quark.netfront.net/pub/YAE/old/yae_wip.tar.gz (source & compiler)

    AUTHOR: Doug Kwan <ctkwan@cs.hku.hk>.

    STATUS: Under development.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: From a posting by the author to comp.emulators.apple2: “I have just uploaded another two binaries for Silicon Graphics workstations and IBM RS6000 workstations (include PowerPC). These files are apple2.mips.gz (40k) and apple2.ibm.gz (21k) respectively. The non-Sun versions do not have a compiler built in but games are very playable with medium fast to very fast workstations. Even with a lot of graphics, the SGI version runs almost native on an R4000 indigo and run faster than a real Apple on an Indigo2 Extreme. The SGI version supports audio.”

    ROMS: Not included.

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/apple.rom

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: DOS3.3 Order (DO – size: 143360 bytes).

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: IBM RS6000/PowerPC workstations running AIX 2.3.

    FURTHER REFERENCES: The “README.apple2.sparc” document describes non-Sun versions.

    http://quark.netfront.net:6502/README.html

    Yet Another Apple ][ Emulator – MIPS

    HOMEPAGE:

    http://quark.netfront.net:6502/

    AVAILABILITY: Available for free download from:

    ftp://ftp.uni-kl.de/pub/apple2/emulators/d_kwan/apple2.mips.Z

    ftp://quark.netfront.net/pub/YAE/old/apple2.mips.gz

    ftp://quark.netfront.net/pub/YAE/old/apple2.mips.elf.gz

    ftp://quark.netfront.net/pub/YAE/old/yae.tar.gz (source)

    ftp://quark.netfront.net/pub/YAE/old/yae_wip.tar.gz (source & compiler)

    AUTHOR: Doug Kwan <ctkwan@cs.hku.hk>.

    STATUS: Under development.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: From a posting by the author to comp.emulators.apple2: “I have just uploaded another two binaries for Silicon Graphics workstations and IBM RS6000 workstations (include PowerPC). These files are apple2.mips.gz (40k) and apple2.ibm.gz (21k) respectively. The non-Sun versions do not have a compiler built in but games are very playable with medium fast to very fast workstations. Even with a lot of graphics, the SGI version runs almost native on an R4000 indigo and run faster than a real Apple on an Indigo2 Extreme. The SGI version supports audio.”

    ROMS: Not included.

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/apple.rom

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: DOS3.3 Order (DO – size: 143360 bytes).

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: Silicon Graphics Iris Indigo (R3000/R4000), Crimson, Indigo2, Indigo2 Extreme running Irix 4.0.X.

    FURTHER REFERENCES: The “README.apple2.sparc” document describes non-Sun versions.

    http://quark.netfront.net:6502/README.html

    Yet Another Apple ][ Emulator – SPARC

    HOMEPAGE:

    http://quark.netfront.net:6502/

    AVAILABILITY: Available for free download from:

    ftp://ftp.uni-kl.de/pub/apple2/emulators/d_kwan/apple2.sparc.Z

    ftp://quark.netfront.net/pub/YAE/old/apple2.sparc.gz

    ftp://quark.netfront.net/pub/YAE/old/yae.tar.gz (source)

    ftp://quark.netfront.net/pub/YAE/old/yae_wip.tar.gz (source & compiler)

    AUTHOR: Doug Kwan <ctkwan@cs.hku.hk>.

    STATUS: Under development.

    SHORT DESCRIPTION: Apple2.sparc is an emulator still in the testing stage. It translates on-the-fly 6502 machine codes into SPARC equivalents. Only one slot 6 disk-drive is supported, although the emulator can write to the disk-images. Check the README file for further emulator specifications. The Apple ROMs are not provided; they must be copied into two binary files named “APPLE.ROM” and “DISK.ROM”. Only the Sun version supports run-time code generation.

    ROMS: Not included.

    ftp://ftp.apple.asimov.net/pub/apple_II/emulators/rom_images/apple.rom

    DISK-IMAGE FORMAT: DOS3.3 Order (DO – size: 143360 bytes).

    MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: Sun SPARC’s running SunOS 4.X and Solaris (SunOS 5.X).

    FURTHER REFERENCES: The “README.apple2.sparc” document contains basic information on this emulator. The document also describes non-Sun versions.

    http://quark.netfront.net:6502/README.html